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Example of badges and knowledge tree gamification efforts on Khan Academy a free educational video and interactive tutorial site. https://www.khanacademy.org 

Example of badges and knowledge tree gamification efforts on Khan Academy a free educational video and interactive tutorial site. https://www.khanacademy.org 

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The use of games to make boring activities fun is usually a bad idea. The thoughtless use of points and badges as a method of " gamification " is usually a bad idea. Pandering to stereotypes about women by making games pink and on " girly " topics is usually a bad idea. Yet, these design tactics may provide face saving strategies for those who are...

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... the notion of points, badges, and achievement levels continues to gain popular support. We can see it in growing number of gamification companies and consultants (Kim, Robert 2015), in the increasing use of these types of systems in online courses (Gené, Núñez, and Blanco 2014) and educational technology (Figure 2.) (Morrison and DiSalvo 2014) that the trend isn't going away. What is it about gamification that is appealing, despite its lack of pedagogical strength in most applications? ...

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... In contrast, the possible risks of educational gamification must also be considered. Recent literature mainly mentions pointsification and excess extrinsic motivation [13,14]. When the gamification system, or PBL (Points-Badges-Leaderboard), consists primarily, or exclusively, of the acquisition of points for performing tasks, students may be interested in the short term. ...
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... However, despite its success, gamifcation has also received considerable criticism. Due to many gamifed systems primarily quantifying user behavior and aiming to increase performance through a mere addition of external rewards, terms such as pointsifcation [43], exploitationware [6], sugar-coating or chocolate-dipped broccoli [14] emerged. Critics proclaim that performance increase is often prioritized at the expense of providing an enjoyable experience [45,79]. ...
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