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Example of Inductive Content and Thematic Analysis

Example of Inductive Content and Thematic Analysis

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Professional development is critical for preparing undergraduate CS students for their future careers. Industry internships offer students pathways for professional development. However, little is empirically known about the impact industry-based internships have on CS students' career paths as well as the effectiveness of CS degree programs in pre...

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... the data was recoded. Table 3 highlights an example of our inductive content and thematic analysis. This was followed by a frequency analysis of responses within each theme. ...

Citations

... Industry internships offer computing students the opportunity to further develop their professional non-technical and technical skills, establish their career interests and secure future employment [10,15,16]. It is an opportunity for student professional development through industry mentor support, professional team membership, working on projects as well as building their confidence, project management, communication skills and expand their professional network [10,21,26]. ...
... Most undergraduates pursuing a computer science degree chose the major because they believe it will improve their job prospects in industry [1,13,25], but a disconnect between coursework and industry has long been reported by both graduates [3,6,18] and employers [3]. Institutions commonly try to resolve this disconnect through industry engagement opportunities such as capstone projects, mentoring, guest speakers, and internships. ...
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Preprint
Internships help students connect what they have learned in the classroom to the real world, and students with access to internships are more likely to graduate and secure employment. However, many students are unable to find an internship by the time they graduate. This experience report describes a program where volunteer software engineers mentor students as they work on open-source projects in the summer, offered as an alternative to a traditional internship experience. We catalog the considerations involved in providing an experience similar to a traditional internship, describe our program's design, and provide two years' worth of participant evaluations and career outcomes as a measure of efficacy. The program served mostly undergraduates from non-R1 schools who are underrepresented in technology, and achieved similar educational outcomes to a traditional internship program. Most promisingly, mentors were willing to serve as a professional reference for 80% of students and the number of graduating seniors who secured full-time employment in technology was 7 points higher than average (despite occurring during the COVID-19 pandemic).
... To this end, professional experiences have demonstrated an important role in computing students' development. Previously Kapoor and Gardner-McCune investigated professional identification with computing, and students long term career goals, and emphasized the necessity of schools offering activities to improve engagement and performance [23]. They suggested that capstone courses, internships, and experiences such as hackathons can help with student development [23,31]. ...
... Previously Kapoor and Gardner-McCune investigated professional identification with computing, and students long term career goals, and emphasized the necessity of schools offering activities to improve engagement and performance [23]. They suggested that capstone courses, internships, and experiences such as hackathons can help with student development [23,31]. ...
... Identity theory considers the multi-dimensional and dynamic conceptualization of self, and the factors that contribute to its development [23,32]. While many factors may influence a student's identity, in this work we focus on aspects of social identity and disciplinary identity. ...
... Internships provide students an opportunity to engage in experiential learning that enhances their intellectual, personal, professional, and ethical growth [15,39]. In addition, industry internships enable CS students to explore computing pathways, determine likes and dislikes, develop professional skills, and build professional networks in a conducive environment [19,22,41]. Employers consider internships as a crucial criterion for recruitment as they provide an opportunity to evaluate potential candidates over an extended period of time in a working environment [28,38]. ...
... The latter report suggests that current CS graduates may be underprepared to secure computing jobs, further exacerbating the current challenge the US educational system is facing in satisfying the demand for computing jobs [7]. Given the role of internships in building professional skills and securing full-time employment [22,28], it is therefore necessary to understand CS students' participation in internships. Thus, in this paper we focus on exploring 536 CS undergraduate students' participation in industry internship(s) in the United States and answer the following research questions: RQ1. ...
... Research in professional development for CS undergraduate students has focused on the professional development of students through participation in capstone courses [30,36], co-curricular activities [13], project-based courses [11], local community-service projects [10], part-time or remote internships [29], or experience in an internship or workintegrated learning program developed through industryacademia partnerships [5,14]. However, research on professional development through CS industry internships is limited and includes inquiries on understanding the role of internships in professional identity formation [26,40], identifying the barriers that CS students face to secure an internship [21], or exploring student experiences of participation in an internship [4,22,33,41]. However, there is a lack of research that focuses on identifying the characteristics of CS students who participate in industry internships as well as student attributes that help them to secure internships. ...
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Conference Paper
Industry internships offer CS students an opportunity to gain authentic disciplinary experiences, evaluate self-interests, and secure future employment. However, little is empirically known about CS students' participation in industry internships and the preparation process used to successfully securing an internship. This paper presents findings from our multi-institutional study aimed at understanding the participation of CS students in industry internships as well as analyzing the differences between students who intern and those who do not. We surveyed 536 CS undergraduate students across three universities in the United States and analyzed the quantitative data using descriptive and inferential statistical methods. We used thematic analysis on the open-ended survey responses. Overall, we found that 40% of students participate in at least one internship. Demographically, equal proportions of males and females interned. However, we observed that students who have higher socioeconomic status were more likely to intern. Academically, there were no significant differences between students who intern and those who do not. However, through thematic analysis, we found differences regarding students' preparation process. Interns explicitly prepared to secure internship positions by practicing interview questions and dedicating time to career preparation. Students who do not intern were less involved in the application process or relied on coursework for securing internships. Quantitative results from the survey corroborated our qualitative findings that factors outside of coursework are influencing students' ability to secure industry internships.
... For example, a large proportion of agency supervisors and students reported high levels of support for requiring internships as a component of an undergraduate education in computer science (CS) in furthering job readiness. In their study of internship experiences among CS students, Kapoor and Gardner-McCune (2019) found that internships strengthened students' commitment to CS degrees and careers, encouraged exploration of CS careers and industries, promoted personal/professional growth, and developed an awareness of professional expectations. These results may be generalizable to students in other fields of study who complete internships to further their employment opportunities. ...
... These results may be generalizable to students in other fields of study who complete internships to further their employment opportunities. The researchers also analyzed students' perception of the curriculum's effectiveness and found that students were strategically working to improve their technical skills outside of coursework to secure employment (Kapoor & Gardner-McCune, 2019). These findings have the potential to retain students in the field of CS and to reduce the gaps between academia and industry, thereby increasing CS students' competitiveness in the workforce. ...
... In addition, internships helped the students to grow both personally and professionally. Their personal growth was not limited to an increase in their knowledge and skills; their responses also pointed to evidence of growth in dispositional temperament, including confidence and responsibility (Kapoor & Gardner-McCune, 2019). ...
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Article
There are numerous studies on the benefits of internships in the extant literature, although many of these studies focused on the views of students and professors/instructors. These studies were also conducted mainly in predominantly White institutions. The present study makes an important contribution to the literature by being the first to examine site supervisors’ evaluations of criminal justice interns at a historically Black university (HBCU). It is also one of the first studies to examine the role of internships in professional development at an HBCU. We used ordinary least-squares (OLS) regression to examine data collected between 2015 and 2018 (with an overall sample size of 352), and found that good communication with clients, a professional appearance, and punctuality predicted interns’ professional development. Contrary to expectations, gender and internship length did not predict professional development. The implications of our findings for student professional development and benefits of internships, especially at HBCUs, are discussed.
... While students expect their degrees to prepare them well for industry, many CS graduates unfortunately feel unprepared for the challenges of their first job [2,4,9]. This academia-industry gap in CS was identified at least two decades ago [11], however studies conducted more recently show this gap still persists today [2,4,9]. ...
... While students expect their degrees to prepare them well for industry, many CS graduates unfortunately feel unprepared for the challenges of their first job [2,4,9]. This academia-industry gap in CS was identified at least two decades ago [11], however studies conducted more recently show this gap still persists today [2,4,9]. I can confirm this industry preparation gap from personal experience as I found writing software in industry to be extremely different from what I had learned in university. ...
... They discovered that CS students were not ready to work on customerfocused projects with vague and evolving requirements, on projects that would last for several years, on collaboration with larger teams to design complex systems, and on the use of professional tools and formal practices. On top of that, in a recent survey half of the participating CS students reported that their CS program did not adequately prepare them for their professional experiences [9]. ...
Conference Paper
Previous studies have shown that the transition of recent CS graduates into their first jobs in industry is often not as smooth as one might expect. The difficulties they face are the result of a significant gap between industry expectations and their academic experiences. The presence of the academia-industry gap has been demonstrated repeatedly over the past two decades, but the question remains why it still persists today and what strategies we as CS educators may employ to effectively close it for good. With my thesis I want to take the first steps towards structurally closing this gap.
Article
Summer internships present an opportunity for Computer Science (CS) students to expand and test their skills in “the real world.” These multi-faceted experiences call on students to use technical tools and critical thinking in collaboration with others to solve problems. There are many opportunities for learning and growth: which of these do students find most valuable? In this project, we collect and analyze open-ended reflections by undergraduate CS students at the conclusion of a summer internship. We see that students focus on technical skills, expanding professional networks, and the satisfaction of completing a product that will be of use to others. These insights help inform academic programs that support Computer Science students engaging in these internships and strengthen their connection to on-campus education.