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Estimates of distribution areas (in km²) for 6 species of the genus Argia according to ecological niche models (ENM) and their TSS values.

Estimates of distribution areas (in km²) for 6 species of the genus Argia according to ecological niche models (ENM) and their TSS values.

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Damselflies and dragonflies (Insecta: Odonata) are currently facing a number of threats. One tool to provide a straightforward assessment of risk is distribution area. Here we have used ecological niche modeling to estimate distribution range for 6 species of Argia damselflies distributed in North America: A. cuprea, A. funcki, A. garrisoni, A. har...

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... of data was used for training, and 30% for validation with 10 replicates. The final validation of models was performed with TSS (True Skills Statistics), average net rate of successful prediction for sites of presence and absence ( Liu et al., 2009), ranging from -1 to 1, where the more positive values indicate a higher degree of accuracy and discrimination model ( Allouche et al., 2006) (Table 1). It is noteworthy that the result of these models is not the area that species occupies absolutely, because these models do not consider population dynamics, dispersibility, interactions with other species and human impacts. ...

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... We used spatial environmental data relevant to the biology of the species to produce the dataset that would represent the ecological niches [52][53][54][55]. Climatic data were obtained from WorldClim Version 1.4 [56] (http://www.worldclim.org/ ...
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