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Estimated posterior probabilities and Delta K for each K partition.

Estimated posterior probabilities and Delta K for each K partition.

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Article
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Apis mellifera scutellata and A.m. capensis, two native subspecies of western honey bees in the Republic of South Africa (RSA), are important to beekeepers in their native region because beekeepers use these bees for honey production and pollination purposes. Additionally, both bees are important invasive pests outside of their native ranges. Recen...

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... genetically heterogeneous clusters were detected by STRUCUTRE as the value of Delta K was greatest at K = 2. The average value of posterior probabilities and Delta K for each K are shown in Table 5. The results suggest that the sampled honey bees belong to two large genetic groups at the subspecies level, with evidence of admixture patterns across the regions of the two defined populations (Fig. 2). ...
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... genetically heterogeneous clusters were detected by STRUCUTRE as the value of Delta K was greatest at K = 2. The average value of posterior probabilities and Delta K for each K are shown in Table 5. The results suggest that the sampled honey bees belong to two large genetic groups at the subspecies level, with evidence of admixture patterns across the regions of the two defined populations (Fig. 2). ...

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... There are also techniques for screening for unwanted species/subspecies of honey bees, though they vary in degree of accuracy. For example, the African honey bee, A. m. scutellata, and its hybrids can be identified using a reduced set of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), a real-time qPCR assay, or combinations of morphological features (Pinto et al., 2014;Harpur et al., 2015;Munoz et al., 2015;Eimanifar et al., 2018Eimanifar et al., , 2020Boardman et al., 2021;Momeni et al., 2021). Geo-morphometric analyses of honey bee wings coupled with SNP data (Calfee et al., 2020;Henriques et al., 2020), or geo-morphometrics alone (Nawrocka et al., 2018;Bustamante et al., 2020) have been used to identify A. m. scutellata populations as well. ...
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