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Estimated exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). The EEZs of countries that are the Parties to the Nauru Agreement are shown in darker blue. Note that not all EEZs of PICTs have been officially delineated under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 

Estimated exclusive economic zones (EEZs) of Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). The EEZs of countries that are the Parties to the Nauru Agreement are shown in darker blue. Note that not all EEZs of PICTs have been officially delineated under the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea 

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Article
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The four species of tuna that underpin oceanic fisheries in the tropical Pacific (skipjack, yellowfin, bigeye and albacore tuna) deliver great economic and social benefits to Pacific Island countries and territories (PICTs). Domestic tuna fleets and local fish processing operations contribute 3–20 % to gross domestic product in four PICTs and licen...

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... the 5-year period 2006-2010, the total annual catch of all tuna species from the WCPO was ~2.4 million tonnes, with ~50 % coming from the EEZs of PICTs (Fig. 1). Purse seining accounted for ~85 % of the fish caught by the surface fishery and most (75 %) of the fish taken by this method were skipjack tuna (Williams and Terawasi 2010). The remainder of the purse-seine catch was mainly yellowfin tuna (~20 %) and bigeye tuna (~5 %). The spawning biomass and fishing mortality of skipjack and ...
Context 2
... 1999 and 2008, the great majority of the catch by the surface fishery taken from the waters of PICTs came from the EEZs of the eight countries that are the Parties to the Nauru Agreement (PNA) (Fig. 1) (Williams and Terawasi 2010). The volumes and values of fish landed over this 10-year period are a reasonably good indication of the relative importance of the catches in each EEZ because they average out some of the ENSO events that influence the distribution of skipjack tuna and fishing effort across the region ( Lehodey et al. ...

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... The results are not very different from the tropical Pacific RCP4.5 projections, with projected temperature increases of about +1.2 to 1.4°C by 2100 and an increase in rainfall of about 4% (Table 29-1). A comprehensive assessment of the vulnerability of the fisheries and aquaculture sectors to climate change in 22 Pacific island countries and territories focused on two future time frames (2035 and 2100) and two SRES emissions scenarios, B1 (low emissions) and A2 (high emissions) (Bell et al., 2013). Many anticipated changes in habitat and resource availability such as coral reef-based fisheries are negative. ...
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