Estimated Number of Connected Devices Per Person By 2025

Estimated Number of Connected Devices Per Person By 2025

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With the widespread use of IoT devices in safety-critical applications, new constraints should be addressed in designing IoT infrastructures. Reliability is one of the most important characteristics of an IoT system which should be satisfied with high consideration. The way how IoT devices communicate with each other in different layers of architec...

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... may reach as much as $11.1 trillion by 2025 [1]. On the other hand the total number of smart connected devices around the world is rising rapidly, that many institutions such as IHS R reported 20.3 Billion connected "Things" will Be in Use in 2017 which would rise up to more than 75 billion at the end of 2025. As it has been illustrated in Fig. 1, based on the informations on population and total number of connected devices [2], [3], we have anticipated that there will be more than 9 smart devices per person at the end of 2025. This amount of interconnected devices would raise many ...

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