Table 2 - uploaded by Lut Van Laer
Content may be subject to copyright.
Environmental factors

Environmental factors

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Age-related hearing impairment (ARHI) is the most common sensory impairment seen in the elderly. It is a complex disorder, with both environmental as well as genetic factors contributing to the impairment. The involvement of several environmental factors has been partially elucidated. A first step towards the identification of the genetic factors h...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... habits and alcohol (ab)use may also have an effect on the development of ARHI, although the study results are controversial ( table 2 ). Cigarette smoking may increase the need for oxygen. ...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Current studies are inconclusive regarding specific patterns of gender differences in age-associated hearing loss. This paper presents results from the largest and longest longitudinal study reported to date of changes in pure-tone hearing thresholds in men and women screened for otological disorders and noise-induced hearing loss. Since 1965, the...
Article
Full-text available
Changes in hearing thresholds over a 10-year period in a large population of older adults (2130) ranging in age from 48 to 92 years were documented. Pure-tone thresholds at frequencies from 0.5 to 8 kHz were evaluated at a baseline examination and 2.5, 5, and 10 years later. For younger age groups (50-69 years of age), threshold changes were genera...
Article
Full-text available
Background and objectives: The purpose of the present study was to provide the hearing threshold levels in the elderly Korean population, and to compare Korean data with that in the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) 7029 (2000). Subjects and methods: Data were collected from a total of 526 ears from 112 males and 151 females a...
Article
Full-text available
Aging is a natural consequence of a society developing process. The city of São Paulo has almost one million people who are above sixty years of age. Age-related hearing loss equals the total hearing loss resulted from cell degeneration caused by noise exposure, ototoxic agents and the loss caused by disorders and medical treatments. To study age-r...
Article
Full-text available
Over the last 6 months, all patients seen at the otologic clinic of Brasília University Medical School answered a questionnaire designed to identify and describe the symptom of tinnitus. A total of 500 patients reported and described this symptom. They underwent physical examination, laboratory tests and audiological evaluation. In their order of f...

Citations

... The selected independent variables on affected side included potential factors related to the severity of ISSNHL: patient age, DM, HTN, HLD, current or past smoking status; cardiac disease (e.g., CHF, vascular disease, Afib); and presence of V/D symptoms [10][11][12][13] . For evaluation of the healthy side, the independent variables included potential risk factors for age-related hearing loss: patient age, sex, DM, HTN, HLD, current or past smoking status, cardiac disease, and stroke or TIA [14][15][16][17][18]20,21 . ...
... Although there are no reports on risk factors associated with an increase in hearing thresholds on the healthy side of patients with ISSNHL, the primary risk factors are those related to aging. There are a number of reported risk factors for age-related hearing loss, including advancing age, being male, smoking, alcohol use, DM, HTN, heart disease, noise exposure, and genetic predisposition 7,[14][15][16][17][18]20,21,46 . In the present study, older ages, being male, and vascular disease were associated with higher PTA thresholds on the healthy side. ...
Article
Full-text available
Atherosclerosis is reported to be a risk factor for the severity of idiopathic sudden sensorineural hearing loss (ISSNHL). We evaluated the hypothesis that atherosclerosis affects the hearing thresholds of both the affected and healthy sides of ISSNHL patients. We conducted multivariate analyses on retrospectively collected data of patients with ISSNHL (N = 762) to evaluate the relationship between known factors linked to atherosclerosis and hearing thresholds on affected and healthy sides and whether these factors are prognostic for hearing recovery. Older ages, vertigo or dizziness, diabetes mellitus, and congestive heart failure were significantly related to higher hearing thresholds on the affected side. Older ages, male, and vascular disease were significantly related to higher hearing thresholds on the healthy side. Vertigo or dizziness, severe hearing loss and hearing loss at high frequencies on the affected side, higher hearing thresholds on the healthy side, regular anticoagulant medication, and delayed steroid treatment were significantly related to lack of recovery. Since several atherosclerosis-related factors are associated with higher hearing thresholds on both affected and healthy sides in ISSNHL and higher hearing thresholds on the healthy side predict poorer prognosis, diagnosis, and predicting prognosis of ISSNHL may benefit from rigorous evaluation of patients’ cardiovascular comorbidities and hearing levels on both the healthy and affected sides.
... Hearing loss is a growing important global public concern.Hearing loss is not only restricting individual's ability to communicate and interact, but may also have a negative impact on physical and psycological well-being and quality of (1,2) life. Genetic susceptibility, environmental factors, such as systemic diseases, noise, chemical exposure, tobacco, alcohol, ototoxic medication may also contribute to the (3) variation in the frequency and severity of hearing loss. Identication of preventable or modiable factors for hearing loss that could be useful to prevent or at least delay this (4) condition should be a top public health priority. ...
Article
Hearing loss is a growing important global public health concern. Emerging evidence implicates high BMI as a risk factor for hearing loss. Identication of modiable factors for hearing loss that could be useful to prevent or at least delay the condition. We aimed to assess relation between body mass index and hearing loss and also to asses the parameters closely associated with obesity such as lipid parameters, blood sugars and their association on hearing threshold.In this cross sectional study conducted for a period of 6 months on 460 subjects presented with hearing loss, tinnitus and vertigo. BMI of each individual was calculated and categorized. They were subjected to audiometric evaluation.Overweight (88.1%) and obese participants (85.5%) showed association with hearing loss. Mild and moderate hearing loss was more common in both over weight and obese patients with signicant p value (<0.001). BMI categories with deranged RBS, deranged lipid parameters there was association with hearing loss. Our study demonstrated association was found between obesity and hearing loss.We emphasize that obesity and various risk factors associated with obesity may play role in hearing loss, So early screening of obese subjects may provide early diagnosis of hearing loss.
... broader health, environment, and lifestyle habits (Doty, 2018;Owsley, 2016;Swenor et al., 2020;Van Eyken et al., 2007). In addition to exploring the biological changes that occur within ageing sensory systems, there is a pressing need to understand the functional consequences of such changes; that is, how sensory decline impacts upon an older adult's intrinsic ability to successfully interact with his/her external environment and maintain his/her normal, everyday routine. ...
... In addition to exploring the biological changes that occur within ageing sensory systems, there is a pressing need to understand the functional consequences of such changes; that is, how sensory decline impacts upon an older adult's intrinsic ability to successfully interact with his/her external environment and maintain his/her normal, everyday routine. Indeed, sensory decline is associated with increased risk of adverse outcomes including malnutrition, frailty, falls, depression, social isolation and mortality (e.g., Appollonio et al., 1995;Doty, 2018;Frank et al., 2019;Owsley, 2016;Tan et al., 2020;Van Eyken et al., 2007;Yu & Liljas, 2019), underscoring the importance of investigating sensory health in ageing populations. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background and Objectives Self-reported sensory data provide important insight into an individual’s perception of sensory ability. It remains unclear what factors predict longitudinal change in self-reported sensory ability across multiple modalities during healthy ageing. This study examined these associations in a cohort of older adults for vision, hearing, taste and smell. Research Design and Methods Data on self-report sensory ability were drawn from 5,065 participants of The Irish Longitudinal Study on Ageing (mean age at baseline = 61.6, SD = 9.5, range 32 – 93 years; 59% female; resident in the Republic of Ireland) across six waves of data collection (2009 – 2021). Covariates included demographics, lifestyle factors and measures of sensory-, physical- mental- and cognitive health. Independent discrete survival analyses were performed for each sensory modality. Results A transition to self-reported fair/poor hearing was most prevalent (21% of the sample), followed by fair/poor vision (19%), smell (11%) and taste (6%). Participants who self-reported fair/poor function in one sensory modality were likely to report fair/poor ability in another sensory modality, although not for all pairings. Only self-rated fair/poor health was associated with increased odds of self-reported fair/poor ability across all sensory modalities. Age was associated with increased odds of self-reported fair/poor hearing, smell and taste as was current smoker status (vision, smell and taste). Several other sensory (e.g., eye disease, hearing aid use) and non-sensory covariates (e.g., education, depression) were associated with the odds of self-reported fair/poor ability in one or two sensory modalities only. Discussion and Implications Over time, older adults perceive associations in fair/poor ability for multiple sensory modalities, albeit somewhat inconsistently. Both modality-general and modality-specific factors are associated with a transition from normal to fair/poor sensory ability. These results suggest the need for more routine testing of multiple senses with increasing age.
... It is currently believed to be caused by a combination of genetics, environmental factors, lifestyle, and others. Common risk factors include congenital disease, age, noise exposure, use of ototoxic drugs and solvents, chronic inflammation, oxidative stress injuries, diabetes, and hypertension [1][2][3][4]. Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) are the most common subtypes, and HL has a variety of adverse effects on health and is significantly increased with advancing age, with HL also being described as an independent risk factor for dementia [5]. According to the World Health Organization (WHO) estimates from 2019, about 1.57 billion people worldwide suffer from hearing loss with this number likely to increase to more than 2.45 billion in 2050 [6]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background: Observational studies have suggested that there may be an association between telomere length (TL) and hearing loss (HL). However, inferring causality from observational studies is subject to residual confounding effects, reverse causation, and bias. This study adopted a two-sample Mendelian randomization (MR) approach to evaluate the causal relationship between TL and increased risk of HL. Methods: A total of 16 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) associated with TL were identified from a genome-wide association study (GWAS) meta-analysis of 78,592 European participants and applied to our modeling as instrumental variables. Summary-level data for hearing loss (HL), age-related hearing loss (ARHL), and noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) were obtained from the recent largest available GWAS and five MR analyses were used to investigate the potential causal association of genetically predicted TL with increased risk for HL, including the inverse-variance-weighted (IVW), weighted median, MR-Egger regression, simple mode, and weighted mode. In addition, sensitivity analysis, pleiotropy, and heterogeneity tests were also used to evaluate the robustness of our findings. Results: There was no causal association between genetically predicted TL and HL or its subtypes (by the IVW method, HL: odds ratio (OR) = 1.216, p = 0.382; ARHL: OR = 0.934, p = 0.928; NIHL: OR = 1.003, p = 0.776). Although heterogenous sites rs2736176, rs3219104, rs8105767, and rs2302588 were excluded for NIHL, the second MR analysis was consistent with the first analysis (OR = 1.003, p = 0.572). Conclusion: There was no clear causal relationship between shorter TLs and increased risk of HL or its subtypes in this dataset.
... Impaired surface expression or reduced activity of the K V 7.4 channel leads to functional impairment and has been associated with age-related [17][18][19][20][21], noise-induced [20,[22][23][24][25], ototoxic hearing loss [26], and genetic hearing loss in human hereditary deafness DFNA2 [27][28][29]. The central role of the K V 7.4 channel for OHC function and survival has been demonstrated by genetic ablation in Kcnq4 −/− mice and loss-of-function mutations leading to progressive hearing loss and slow degeneration of OHCs [30,31]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common sensory impairment mainly caused by degeneration of sensory hair cells in the cochlea with no causal medical treatment available. Auditory function and sensory hair cell survival critically depend on the Kv7.4 (KCNQ4) channel, a voltage-gated potassium channel expressed in outer hair cells (OHCs), with its impaired function or reduced activity previously associated with ARHL. Here, we investigated the effect of a potent small-molecule Kv7.4 agonist on ARHL in the senescence-accelerated mouse prone 8 (SAMP8) model. For the first time in vivo, we show that Kv7.4 activation can significantly reduce age-related threshold shifts of auditory brainstem responses as well as OHC loss in the SAMP8 model. Pharmacological activation of Kv7.4 thus holds great potential as a therapeutic approach for ARHL as well as other hearing impairments related to Kv7.4 function.
... ARHL is driven by both environmental and genetic factors, each contributing about half of the phenotypic variance (Van Eyken et al. 2007;Duan et al. 2019;Hendrickx et al. 2013;Kvestad et al. 2012). Common environmental factors include noise, smoking, diabetes and hypertension (Akinpelu et al. 2014;Przewoźny et al. 2015;Van Eyken et al. 2007), while several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated a long list of associated genes (Wells et al. 2019;Nagtegaal et al. 2019). ...
... ARHL is driven by both environmental and genetic factors, each contributing about half of the phenotypic variance (Van Eyken et al. 2007;Duan et al. 2019;Hendrickx et al. 2013;Kvestad et al. 2012). Common environmental factors include noise, smoking, diabetes and hypertension (Akinpelu et al. 2014;Przewoźny et al. 2015;Van Eyken et al. 2007), while several genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have generated a long list of associated genes (Wells et al. 2019;Nagtegaal et al. 2019). As a complex trait, presbycusis is thus influenced by a combination of multiple environmental and genetic risk factors. ...
... Age-related hearing loss (ARHL), or presbycusis, affects one of every three persons aged more than 65 years, with an estimated worldwide prevalence of ∼430 million people (World Health Organisation [WHO], 2021). Presbycusis is produced by neurodegenerative processes of peripheral and central auditory structures (Gates and Mills, 2005), which, at the clinical level, is characterized by bilateral high-frequency hearing loss and deteriorated speech intelligibility (Van Eyken et al., 2007). Oral communication relies on a series of neural mechanisms involving hearing and cognitive functions (Ruggles et al., 2011;Pienkowski, 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Presbycusis or age-related hearing loss is a prevalent condition in the elderly population, which affects oral communication, especially in background noise, and has been associated with social isolation, depression, and cognitive decline. However, the mechanisms that relate hearing loss with cognition are complex and still elusive. Importantly, recent studies show that the use of hearing aids in presbycusis, which is its standard management, can induce neuroplasticity and modify performance in cognitive tests. As the majority of the previous studies on audition and cognition obtained their results from a mixed sample of subjects, including presbycusis individuals fitted and not fitted with hearing aids, here, we revisited the associations between hearing loss and cognition in a controlled sample of unaided presbycusis. We performed a cross-sectional study in 116 non-demented Chilean volunteers aged ≥65 years from the Auditory and Dementia study cohort. Specifically, we explored associations between bilateral sensorineural hearing loss, suprathreshold auditory brain stem responses, auditory processing (AP), and cognition with a comprehensive neuropsychological examination. The AP assessment included speech perception in noise (SIN), dichotic listening (dichotic digits and staggered spondaic words), and temporal processing [frequency pattern (FP) and gap-in-noise detection]. The neuropsychological evaluations included attention, memory, language, processing speed, executive function, and visuospatial abilities. We performed an exploratory factor analysis that yielded four composite factors, namely, hearing loss, auditory nerve, midbrain, and cognition. These four factors were used for generalized multiple linear regression models. We found significant models showing that hearing loss is associated with bilateral SIN performance, while dichotic listening was associated with cognition. We concluded that the comprehension of the auditory message in unaided presbycusis is a complex process that relies on audition and cognition. In unaided presbycusis with mild hearing loss (<40 dB HL), speech perception of monosyllabic words in background noise is associated with hearing levels, while cognition is associated with dichotic listening and FP.
... Hereditary hearing loss (HHL) is one of the hereditary disorders and a public health concern, affecting approximately one in 650-1000 newborns in developed countries [1]. Although environmental factors can act as a trigger, the role of genetic factors is significant in the etiology of HL [2]. Current knowledge shows that approximately 70% of all HHL cases are in the form of non-syndromic, in which hearing loss (HL) is the only clinical symptom, while syndromic forms account for 30% of the cases in which HL is part of other syndromes [3]. ...
Article
Full-text available
Background Hereditary hearing loss (HHL) is a common heterogeneous disorder affecting all ages, ethnicities, and genders. The most common form of HHL is autosomal recessive non-syndromic hearing loss (ARNSHL), in which there is no genotype–phenotype correlation in the majority of cases. This study aimed to identify the genetic causes of hearing loss (HL) in a family with Iranian Azeri Turkish ethnicity negative for gap junction beta-2 (GJB2), gap junction beta-6 (GJB6), and mitochondrially encoded 12S rRNA (MT-RNR1) deleterious mutations. Methods Targeted genome sequencing method was applied to detect genetic causes of HL in the family. Sanger sequencing was employed to verify the segregation of the variant. Finally, we used bioinformatics tools and American College of Medical Genetics and Genomics/Association for Molecular Pathology (ACMG/AMP) guidelines to determine whether the detected variant might affect the corresponding protein or not. Results A novel homozygous missense mutation, c.499G>A (p.G167R), was identified in exon 5 of the ESRRB (estrogen-related receptor beta) gene. Healthy and affected family members confirmed the co-segregation of the variant with ARNSHL. Eventually, the variant's pathogenicity was confirmed by the in silico analysis and the ACMG/AMP guidelines. Conclusion The study suggests that the detected variant, c.499G>A, plays a crucial role in the development of ARNSHL, emphasizing the clinical significance of the ESRRB gene in ARNSHL patients. Additionally, it would be helpful for genetic counseling and clinical management of ARNSHL patients and providing preventive opportunities.
... The causes of ARHL are poorly understood with roles for noise, genetics, and the environment thought as contributory ( Agrawal et al., 2008 ;( Kujawa and Liberman, 2006 ) Kujawa et al., 2006;Van Eyken et al., 2007 ). The anatomic location of ARHL is diffuse with evidence of hair cell loss ( McFadden et al., 1999 ), the disordered function of the stria vascularis and fibrocytes ( Ohlemiller et al., 2008 ) and dysregulated central auditory path-✩ All authors have read the manuscript and agree with its contents. ...
Article
ARHL has been thought to result from disordered hair cell function and their loss. ARHL has a significant genetic component. We sought to determine the expression in the cochlea of genes associated with single nucleotide polymorphisms linked to ARHL. We find widespread and varying expression of genes associated with these SNPs in subtypes of cells in the cochlea identified by single-cell RNA sequencing. Genes associated with SNPs with the highest significance were preferentially expressed highly in hair cells, while genes associated with SNPs with a lower significance were expressed more universally. In addition, we find significant overlap with genesets associated with Alzheimer's disease suggesting shared mechanisms, and genesets enriched for apical cell polarity and vesicle recycling suggesting mechanisms of cell death/ dysfunction with ageing.
... Controlling for populationspecific genetic factors, true or intrinsic presbycusis was demonstrated in other non-industrial populations (Goycoolea et al., 1986). This supports observations that ARHL develops from the multifactorial interaction of environmental, monogenic, or polygenic factors that shape a complex disease situation (Van Eyken et al., 2007;Vuckovic et al., 2018). The classic human pathophysiological model of ARHL, also known as Schuknecht's typology (Ohlemiller, 2004), is derived from studies of audiometric tests and serial histological sections of postmortem human temporal bones over a span of more than five decades (Schuknecht, 1955(Schuknecht, , 1964(Schuknecht, , 1974(Schuknecht, , 1993Schuknecht and Gacek, 1993;Merchant and Nadol, 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
Age-related hearing loss (ARHL) is the most common sensory deficit in aging society, which is accompanied by increased speech discrimination difficulties in noisy environments, social isolation, and cognitive decline. The audiometric degree of ARHL is largely correlated with sensory hair cell loss in addition to age-related factors not captured by histopathological analysis of the human cochlea. Previous studies have identified the senescence-accelerated mouse prone strain 8 (SAMP8) as a model for studying ARHL and age-related modifications of the cochlear redox environment. However, the SAMP8 population exhibits a large variability in auditory function decline over age, whose underlying cause remains unknown. In this study, we analyzed auditory function of SAMP8 mice by measuring auditory brainstem response (ABR) thresholds at the age of 6 weeks (juvenile), 12 weeks (young adult), and 24 weeks (adult). Consistent with previous studies, SAMP8 mice exhibit an early progressive, age-related decline of hearing acuity. However, a spatiotemporal cytohistological analysis showed that the significant increase in threshold variability was not concurrently reflected in outer hair cell (OHC) loss observed in the lower and upper quartiles of the ABR threshold distributions over age. This functional loss was found to precede OHC loss suggesting that age-related phenotypic changes may be contributing factors not represented in cytohistological analysis. The expression of potassium channels KCNQ4 (Kv7.4), which mediates the current I K,n crucial for the maintenance of OHC membrane potential, and KCNQ1 (Kv7.1), which is an essential component in potassium circulation and secretion into the endolymph generating the endocochlear potential, showed differences between these quartiles and age groups. This suggests that phenotypic changes in OHCs or the stria vascularis due to variable oxidative deficiencies in individual mice may be predictors of the observed threshold variability in SAMP8 mice and their progressive ARHL. In future studies, further phenotypic predictors affected by accumulated metabolic challenges over age need to be investigated as potentially underlying causes of ARHL preceding irreversible OHC loss in the SAMP8 mouse model.