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Enrollment, verification, identification in a biometric system 

Enrollment, verification, identification in a biometric system 

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The advancement and the evolution of mobile communications and mobile device technology have led to a remarkable growth and tremendous requirement for mobile applications that are carried on mobile phones. These technologies have lead to the deployment of business, communications, and mobile services, and hence, gave rise to mobile payments. The mo...

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... this process customer biometric template is verified to authenticate the payment. In verifica- tion process the customer enters their customer identity number into the verification system. The system then prompts the customer to present their live biometric on the scanner. The live biometric is then compared with the biometric template stored against the customer identity number in the biometric server. In case the verification is successful the payment transaction is considered authenticated and the transaction sent to the bank for processing. In case of a failure the customer may be asked to present the biometric template again up to a certain maximum number of tries. In the identification process, the system recognizes an individual by searching the templates of all the users in the database for a match (Figure 3). Therefore, the system conducts a one-to-many comparison to establish an individual’s identity (or fails if the subject is not enrolled in the system database) without the subject having to claim an identity (e.g., “Whose biometric data is this?”). Identification is a critical component in negative recognition applications where the system estab- lishes whether the person is who she (implicitly or explicitly) denies to be. The purpose of negative recognition is to prevent a single person from us- ing multiple identities. Identification may also be used in positive recognition for convenience (the user is not required to claim an identity). While traditional methods of personal recognition such as passwords, PINs, keys, and tokens may work for positive recognition, negative recognition can only be established through biometrics. To implementing a biometric authenticated pay- ment a system requires three primary system elements to be put in place by a bank or acquirer (Figure 4). These are: It is used for enrolling customers on to the program and recording their biometric identity. In enrol- ment stage the biometric images of the different individuals to be verified are first processed by feature extraction module; the extracted features are stored as template in a database for later use. Used at retail locations for verifying the live bio- metric template with the stored fingerprints for authenticating payments. The biometric image of the individual to be verified first processed by feature extraction modules; the extracted features are then fed to a matching module with his/her identity ID, which matches them against his/her templates in the database. Used for storing the biometric template, extract- ing and verifying biometric template during a payment process and providing an interface to banks and acquirers for managing the customer data and reports. The authentication models for authenticating are to authenticate the customer who has registration in the service of the biometric payment system. Most models are based on network authentica- tion system and are composed of client terminal, server side, which is used to collect the multimodal biometric data and to provide the services respec- tively. The biometrics template storage place and the verification place may be held at client side, server side and trusted third party (TTP) that may be a smart card to perform complex calculations. The different components that are interacting for secure online transactions for the biometric pay- ment systems are: It has access to customer’s data; establishes connection with the Online Banking Software (BSW); conducts capital transactions and is able to identify a Biometric Trusted Device (BTD) as a communication partner to establish a secure connection. It is stored on the client and communicates with SBS in order to process different transactions. A trusted piece of hardware with predefined security criteria to provide secure functionality; cannot be manipulated by malware; has a biometric capture device as a fake resistant sensor which is qualified for unsupervised operation. An additional hardware is required to implement the biometric template in the proposed method- ology. Biometric identification systems (BIS) is based around a core Automated Fingerprint Identification System ( AFIS) that offers full biometric integration – with the inclusion of fin- gerprints, palm-prints, facial images, descriptive data, signatures and documents. Known as mul- timodal biometrics (or ‘fusion’ technology), this approach optimizes the results of search queries, consequently achieving more accurate responses. Common BIS elements include: It is a central repository (e.g. Oracle database) for storage and near-immediate retrieval of biometric identifiers together with associated features and textual data. (Known as ‘descriptor’ data) These are equipped with a camera and scanner to enable the capture, encoding and submission of finger/palm-print images, slap impressions, rolled fingerprint images, photographs, signatures and demographic information. Are designed for the dedicated review and verifica- tion of search results, as well as match analysis. Allow the identification of individuals when the subject is present at the time of processing. Portable and single-finger scanning devices, cameras, two/ten-print card printers, automated case management systems, Web servers, applica- tion servers, mobile gateways, descriptor import/ export modules. The barcode technology has been developed with the creation of 2D barcodes to increase the data capacity of 1D barcodes. With the integration of cameras, mobile phones act as scanners, barcode readers and portable data storages and maintaining network connectivity. When used together with such camera phones, 2D-barcodes work as a tag to connect the digital and physical world. Today most of the mobile applications encode a URL or a website address inside a 2D barcode to visit a Web page containing a video clip or a document that can be accessed from a mobile Web browser. A 2D barcode can also represent a business card, an advertisement coupon, product information and it can be used in visual cryptography. In mobile payment systems, 2D barcodes are used to support presale, buy and sell, post sale operations in the form of transactions. 2D barcodes can be used to present advertisements, coupons, and receipts, which can be captured and decoded by mobile client software on mobile devices. Moreover, 2D barcodes enable mobile devices to become a point-of-sale device that reads the barcode and facilitates payment transactions. After a payment transaction, 2D barcodes can be used to present a purchase receipt to gain access to the information about the purchased goods and services. There are two ways to build 2D barcodes in mobile payment systems. The first approach is to build 2D barcode-based Position of Sale (POS) sys- tems. The objective is to support mobile payment transactions between mobile users and mobile terminals at anytime and anywhere. This type of POS-based payment systems can be used in Parking lots, TAXI, airport and railroad stations. 2D barcodes are useful to support product infor- mation retrievals, secured payment transactions, customer and product verification, and mobile security checking. The other approach is to build 2D barcode- based systems to allow mobile users to issue mobile payment transactions using their digital wallets based on mobile payment accounts in a mobile payment server. Comparing with the exist- ing account-based mobile payment systems, this approach has five distinct ...

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