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Empirically testable framework for the three cases of urban development and sustainability 

Empirically testable framework for the three cases of urban development and sustainability 

Contexts in source publication

Context 1
... Sustainability performance in the Baltic Sea region countries. Based on methodology presented above we have assessed sustainability performance of the Baltic Sea region countries in terms of the Sustainable GDP method indicators in 2005-2010. In Figure 1 dynamics of sustainable GDP per capita is ...
Context 2
... Towards an empirically testable framework. Figure 1 summarizes the three country-and city-specific urban development and sustainability contexts put forward above. The developed (or Western) type of cases comprises the starting point and benchmark for the other two cases. Here it is assumed -based on the literature and best practice -that by sustaining the optimal preconditions for the market to trigger private in- vestment activity within a favourable institutional framework also the so- cial and cultural spheres will gain in the long run (akin to the case of late Medieval Florence). On the other hand, the discussion above has shown that, while the same applies: economic surplus being the source for financ-ing the social (and cultural) arenas, the need for government steering is stronger in the post-socialist and LDC cases. This is due to their lesser market maturity levels. Furthermore, as long as market structures are yet at an early stage of development it is important that also experiences from the more social agendas are used to consult the more economic agendas in a constant feedback process, and not only in the direction from economic to the social. That is to say, policy discourse is developed through trial and er- ror and through learning by doing. Here obviously experiences from both western and post-socialist contexts are of valuable use in informing how the LDC system on a case by case basis is to be set. Conclusions. A constructive approach to evaluate the sustainability in an urban land use and area development context would be welcome. The broader issue here is about providing services that are not only green but preferably also sustainable in other ways -the social dimension in particu- lar is worth considering. While the point here is about incremental changes rather than 'one grand planning vision', the further issue concerns how the economic sustainability can generate environmental and social sustainabil- ity with view on long-term developments. The solution to this lies in de- signing an economic long-term strategy; the issue at stake is about making the buildings and neighbourhoods more sustainable, or just greener, by re- investing the profits made from developments. When that is carried out consistently over the built environment of a whole urban area together with apt incentives and regulations set on national, regional and local levels, to- gether with capacity building through participatory procedures we are able to confirm patterns of sustainable urban development at the level of blocks and ...
Context 3
... in average real estate prices (per square meter) of residential apartments were studied in the period between the third quarter of 2006 and the third quarter of 2013. We used the data from the Base of Real Estate Housing Prices (BaRN) created by the Polish National Bank (NBP). Table 1 presents the main statistical description of used data from Warsaw and Krakow, while the Figure 1 presents the average nominal prices of 1m 2 of apartments in Warsaw andKrakow in 2006-2013. Real es- tate prices in the whole study, are presented in the Polish currency (1Euro=4,2 ...
Context 4
... we can see from Figure 1 only three countries of the region (Germany, Denmark and Sweden) had positive sustainable GDP in 2005- 2010, other countries contributed negative effect to the region relative sus-tainability. By our calculations Germany has the most efficient economy even on relative base, because of values of sustainable GDP per capita and per unit of GDP. Denmark and Sweden are the sustainability drivers as well. At the same time these countries reduced the level of relative sustain- ability in 2005-2010. It is explained by increasing of the sustainability effi- ciency of such countries mainly as Belarus, Lithuania and ...