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Elevation map of the Albertine Rift (Central Africa) showing sampling localities of forest chameleons (Kinyongia) used in this study. Photographs of representative individuals for each species are displayed on right; image for K. mulyai of the holotype (PEM-R 19199) adapted from Tilbury & Tolley (2015) with permission from Colin R. Tilbury; image for K. adolfifriderici is a lateral view of the preserved holotype (ZMB 22709) taken by Frank Tillack; photographs of K. xenorhina and K. cf. adolfifriderici (Bwindi + Rwenzori – Uganda) = K. tolleyae sp. nov. were taken by DFH; and photographs of K. gyrolepis, K. carpenteri, K. cf. adolfifriderici (Itombwe – DRC) = K. itombwensis sp. nov. and K. cf. adolfifriderici (Kibira – Burundi) = K. rugegensis sp. nov. were taken by EG. 

Elevation map of the Albertine Rift (Central Africa) showing sampling localities of forest chameleons (Kinyongia) used in this study. Photographs of representative individuals for each species are displayed on right; image for K. mulyai of the holotype (PEM-R 19199) adapted from Tilbury & Tolley (2015) with permission from Colin R. Tilbury; image for K. adolfifriderici is a lateral view of the preserved holotype (ZMB 22709) taken by Frank Tillack; photographs of K. xenorhina and K. cf. adolfifriderici (Bwindi + Rwenzori – Uganda) = K. tolleyae sp. nov. were taken by DFH; and photographs of K. gyrolepis, K. carpenteri, K. cf. adolfifriderici (Itombwe – DRC) = K. itombwensis sp. nov. and K. cf. adolfifriderici (Kibira – Burundi) = K. rugegensis sp. nov. were taken by EG. 

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The Albertine Rift (AR) is a centre for vertebrate endemism in Central Africa, yet the mechanisms underlying line-age diversification of the region's fauna remain unresolved. We generated a multilocus molecular phylogeny consisting of two mitochondrial (16S and ND2) and one nuclear (RAG1) gene to reconstruct relationships and examine spatiotemporal...

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... total of 2118 bp was obtained from three loci for each of eight individuals of K. cf. adolfifriderici (16S: 441 bp; ND2: 856 bp; RAG1: 821 bp). There were no gaps in the alignments of any of the three loci after we omitted a hypervariable region consisting of 44 bp from the 16S ribosomal gene. Using AIC in PARTITIONFINDER, we determined that the most appropriate substi- tution models were GTR+G for 16S; GTR+I+G for ND2 first codon position, HKY+G for ND2 second codon position, TIM+G for ND2 third codon position; HKY+G for RAG1 first and second codon positions, HKY+I for RAG1 third codon position. Relationships among Kinyongia species were reconstructed utiliz- ing the concatenated data set and the same topology was recovered using BI and ML methods ( Fig. 1 (Fig. 2). The populations from south- western Uganda (Rwenzori Mountains + Bwindi Impenetrable National Parks) formed a distinct clade that was most closely related to a clade from northern Burundi (Kibira National Park), whereas a clade from the Itombwe Plateau (eastern DRC) was recovered in a sister relationship with a sample from the Ituri rain- forest (northeastern DRC) (Figs 1, 2). The placement of K. gyrolepis from the Lendu Plateau in northeastern DRC within the K. adolfifriderici clade renders the lat- ter species ...
Context 2
... presumably topotypic K. adolfifriderici genetic sample from Loki village is located in the Ituri rainforest, Orientale Province, DRC. This site is c. 75 km (straight line distance) from present-day Irumu village, which is one of the sites provided by Sternfeld (1912) as the type locality for this spe- cies (see Introduction section). Also, the sample was obtained at 1408 m elevation, which is well within the appropriate elevation range for the species (Tilbury, 2010). With putative topotypic genetic mate- rial for K. adolfifriderici, we are confident that the three geographically separated, genetically divergent lineages in the AR represent new species (Itombwe Plateau in southeastern DRC; Kibira National Park in northern Burundi; Bwindi Impenetrable and Rwenzori Mountains National Parks in western Uganda) (Fig. 2). Based on the combined molecular Figure 3. *BEAST species-tree inference for combined data set of Kinyongia species within the clade endemic to the Albertine Rift (in descending order from top of phylogeny): and morphological results presented above, and qualitative differences explained in the following, we describe three new species that were previously con- sidered to be populations of K. adolfifriderici. (Fig. ...

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... The DRC harbors more than 100 described species of lizards (Broadley, 1998;Marques et al., 2019;Uetz et al., 2020), although this number is likely to increase substantially in the future (Greenbaum, 2017). Of these species, seven have been described in the past 10 yr (no new lizards from DRC were described in the postcolonial era between 1965 and 2008), including Congolacerta asukului Greenbaum, Villanueva, Kusamba, Aristote and Branch, 2011; Cordylus marunguensis Greenbaum, Stanley, Kusamba, Moninga [sic], Goldberg and Bursey, 2012a; Kinyongia gyrolepis Greenbaum, Tolley, Joma and Kusamba, 2012b; Kinyongia mulvai Tilbury and Tolley, 2015; Kinyongia itombwensis Hughes, Kusamba, Behangana and Greenbaum, 2017;Rhampholeon hattinghi Tilbury and Tolley, 2015; and Trachylepis raymondlaurenti Marques, Ceríaco, Bandeira, Pauwels and Bauer, 2019. Currently 19 species of geckos (Gekkonidae) are recognized for the country (Broadley, 1998;Uetz et al., 2020 Gray, 1845;and Hemidactylus cf. ...
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... Based on pollen core records (Bonnefille & Riollet, 1988;Brenac, 1988;Girese et al., 1994;Maley, 1987Maley, , 1989Maley, , 1991Maley & Brénac, 1987;Maley & Livingstone, 1983;Sowunmi, 1991) and species distribution data (Colyn, 1987(Colyn, , 1991Richards, 1963;Rietkerk et al., 1995;Sosef, 1991), Maley (1996) proposed several Pleistocene rainforest refugia for sub-Saharan Africa that are still considered today (e.g., Bell et al., 2017;Hughes et al., 2017;Huntley et al., 2019;Jongsma et al., 2018;Larson et al., 2016;Penner et al., 2011;Portik et al., 2017; Figure 1). Many of these hypothesized refugia are located in highland areas (e.g., the Cameroon Volcanic Line and the Albertine Rift; Figure 1, refugia 4 and 10, respectively). ...
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Jackson's Forest Lizard (Adolfus jacksoni) is widespread throughout the highlands of the Albertine Rift, southern Uganda, western and central Kenya, and northern Tanzania. To understand the population genetics and phylogenetic relationships of this widespread taxon, we sequenced two mitochondrial (16S and cyt b) and two nuclear (c-mos and RAG1) genes from multiple populations. Population genetics analyses suggested a high degree of genetic differentiation among A. jacksoni populations, reflecting the high-elevation montane "islands" that they inhabit. Populations connected by a network of mountain ranges generally showed lower levels of genetic partitioning than those isolated by low-elevation habitat. Results from phylogenetic analyses and additional morphological data indicated that Adolfus jacksoni occurs throughout the Albertine Rift, likely from the Kabobo Plateau to the Lendu Plateau of Democratic Republic of the Congo, as well as southern Uganda, Mt. Elgon, and the highlands of western Kenya on the western side of the Kenyan Rift. Adolfus kibonotensis is removed from the synonymy of the latter taxon, elevated to full species, and recognized from the central Kenyan highlands to northern Tanzania on the eastern side of the Kenyan Rift. A new Adolfus species is described from the Mathews Range in central Kenya.