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Effect of harvesting time on groundnut 100-seed weight (g)

Effect of harvesting time on groundnut 100-seed weight (g)

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Groundnut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is one of the most important legume crop in Mozambique which is grown for food as well as cash. It's an indeterminate growth habit and below the ground nature of fruiting makes it difficult to determine the time of optimal maturity of pods. This results in reduced crop yields if either harvested too early or too late...

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... weight of the three groundnut varieties differed significantly as a result of the effect of harvesting time (Table 3). Maximum 100-seed weight (54.9g and 56.9g) was obtained from the variety ICGV-SM-99568 at CIAM and PAN respectively when harvesting was executed at physiological maturity. ...

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... For example, a significant difference in timing for planting and harvesting of groundnut was observed. Groundnut is very susceptible to poor germination and sprouting if planted and harvested, respectively, at the wrong time, thus reducing yield [37]. A significantly higher proportion of plots from MHHs were planted and harvested on time compared to plots from FHHs (Table 1). ...
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Poverty among smallholder farmers in sub-Saharan Africa has been associated with low agricultural productivity emanating from gender yield gaps among other factors. Using data collected from smallholder groundnut producers in Nigeria, we analyzed the gender yield gap by applying the exogenous switching regression (ESR) model and Oaxaca-Blinder (OB) decomposition framework. Results from the two complementary approaches showed a significant gender yield gap in favor of male headed households (MHHs). The main and significant source of the gap was differences in resources/endowments. We found that involving female headed households (FHHs) in prerequisite yield augmenting activities like technology validation trials, testing, and demonstrations is critical in closing the existing yield gap.
... The impact of late harvesting time are less water content and high percentage of mid-mature kernels [3]. The physiological maturity stage is a recommended measure for determining the harvesting time to obtain high pod yield and kernels quality [4]. Therefore, determination of harvest time is essential as it contributes to yield and productivity. ...
... Delaying harvesting time could increase yield, mature kernels, shelling percentage, pod number and pod yield per plant, 100-seed weight, oil and protein contents, and O/L ratio [7][8][9]. In contrast, delaying harvesting time may also increase yield loss. Premature harvesting reduced yield and kernel quality by 16-25% and delayed harvesting resulted in 30-40% yield losses [4]. Genotype with the highest harvest index is characterized by high yield, performances morphology, weight per pod and number of pod per m 2 [13]. ...
... An early harvesting time can reduce the number of pods per plant which lead to low pod and kernel yields. Pod yield of grondnut varieties directly related to kernel yield [4]. On the other hand, pod maturity can be determined by measuring changes in kernel weight and hull weight during maturity, chlorophyll content, amino acid content and maturity index [3]. ...
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Butterfly pea (Clitoria ternatea L.) belongs to legumes (Fabaceae family) and pod-shaped, and multifunction as natural dyes, ornamental plants, medicinal plants, forage fertilizers, and animal feed. This activity aims to determine the advance ploidization of butterfly pea on forage biomass production. This activity was carried out at the greenhouse of Cikeumeuh, ICABIOGRAD Bogor, from October 2019 until February 2020. The material genetics as butterfly pea ratoon have had growth and development good. This study was used a simple complete randomized design with three replications and then data had analyzed statistically. The results showed that accesion of butterfly pea have consisted of each ninth accesion of blue petal and white petal. In the flower type, all of butterfly pea accesions have a single petal type. Then fresh and dry weights of blue petal colour, accesion of numbers 1 (24 hours colchicine immersion), and 5 (72 hours oryzalin immersion) have had a higher weight than a control plant. At the fresh and dry weight of plants at white petal colour, all accesion butterfly pea had a higher weight than the control plant except accesion number of 3 and 4. The weight seed of butterfly pea were highest achieved by 6 and 7 accesion of blue petals, which were 2, 3, 6, 7, and 8 accesion white petals.
... The two high yielding cultivars ICGS-76 and ICGV-86590 recorded significantly (higher number of effective pods over others including local check. A strong positive correlation of these pod attributes with shelling percentage (r= 0.738 -0.921*, p<0.0005) and higher shelling percentage of more than 72% in these two cultivars further affirmed our assumption was in confirmation with the earlier reports (Jnr et al., 2017). Variation in production efficiency was highly influenced by the dry pod yield (per ha) produced by the respective cultivars and was evident from a strong positive correlation (r=0.94, ...
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Performance of 27 improved groundnut cultivars were assessed for agronomic and physiological traits associated to improve the productivity in degraded acid soils under rainfed hilly ecosystem. The cultivars ICGS 76 and ICGV 86590 produced significantly higher pod yield with more than 39% improvement over JL 24. The study also identified five more promising cultivars viz. ICGS 5, TKG 19 A, TG 37A, GG 11 and GG 21 with 19-38% higher yield over the check. The low productivity of cereals in the acidic and moisture stressed Jhum degraded upland soils of rainfed hilly ecosystem of Eastern Himalayan Region is a major concern for socio-economic improvement of resource poor farmers. Adoption of these cultivars is expected to increase the productivity and net income to a tune of 93.2% without incurring any additional costs to the prevailing production system.
... When peanuts are harvested late, some of the pods detach as the plant is dug up and remain in the soil. In experiments conducted in Mozambique, Zuza et al. (2017) showed that groundnuts harvested 10 days after attaining physiological maturity had up to 40% lower pod yield compared with those harvested at physiological maturity. Farmers in Malawi and Zambia usually try to recover detached pods from the soil, and even a few weeks after harvest, communities living around large farms are "allowed" to glean peanuts that have remained in the soil. ...
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Peanut (Arachis hypogaea L.) is an important crop in Malawi and Zambia. The crop is valued for soil improvement in cereal-based cropping systems, for improving the livelihoods of farming households who consume it and also sell it for cash, and for earning foreign exchange when exported. Research and development efforts have resulted in an increase in both area under peanut production and productivity. However, a key challenge that still needs to be solved in these countries is how to produce peanuts with acceptable levels of aflatoxin contamination. Data continues to show that aflatoxin continues to be a problem in both formal and informal trade. As a result, unlike 30 years ago, most of the peanut trade has now shifted to domestic and regional markets that do not restrict the sale of aflatoxin-contaminated peanuts. Impacts of aflatoxin contamination on health and also on the full cost burden of control are not well documented. Technologies are available for mitigating against aflatoxin contamination. The advantages, disadvantages, and gaps associated with these technologies are discussed. A lot of money and effort continues to be invested in Malawi and Zambia into mitigating against aflatoxin contamination, but evidence of long-term success is limited. Based on past and current initiatives, the prospects of eliminating aflatoxin in the near future at the household level and in trade are not promising.