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Edgar Dale's Cone of Experience shows that after two weeks we mainly remember information coming from what we have told or done (active participation), rather than those ones coming from what we have read, listened to or looked at. Audio-visual stimuli together, but with passive engagement, are in the middle of the cone. Image source: http://www.edutechie.ws/2007/10/09/cone-of-experience-media/, Author Jeffrey Anderson.

Edgar Dale's Cone of Experience shows that after two weeks we mainly remember information coming from what we have told or done (active participation), rather than those ones coming from what we have read, listened to or looked at. Audio-visual stimuli together, but with passive engagement, are in the middle of the cone. Image source: http://www.edutechie.ws/2007/10/09/cone-of-experience-media/, Author Jeffrey Anderson.

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Experience design, both in real and in virtual museums, is very complex to be planned, even more when digital contents are juxtaposed to real collections. Researchers in this field, curators, creatives and software developers must work together in order to evolve towards a more efficient interconnection among visitors, collections and digital appli...

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Context 1
... American educator Edgar Dale ) [7] summed up the results of his studies in the "Cone of Experience" schema ( Figure 1). It shows that the quality of information we store does not depend only on the threshold of our attention, but also on the channel we activate to receive it. ...
Context 2
... use of "natural interaction" strongly influences both the level of embodiment in the virtual space, and therefore the perceptive impact that the user gets, both the interface design, the way of structuring and hierarchizing contents, of choosing and selecting them (the input is not as precise and fast as the mouse click), of manipulating objects. The experience is configured as a progression of bodily as well as mental acts (Figure 10). This condition affects the narrative language itself, the duration of the various expressive units: everything must be usable, coherent and harmonious. ...
Context 3
... use of "natural interaction" strongly influences both the level of embodiment in the virtual space, and therefore the perceptive impact that the user gets, both the interface design, the way of structuring and hierarchizing contents, of choosing and selecting them (the input is not as precise and fast as the mouse click), of manipulating objects. The experience is configured as a progression of bodily as well as mental acts (Figure 10). This condition affects the narrative language itself, the duration of the various expressive units: everything must be usable, coherent and harmonious. ...
Context 4
... some years it has become possible to include real actors in interactive 3D environments, in place of 3D characters, thanks to virtual set and chroma-key techniques, managed by common editing software and real time graphic engines. This fact immediately influences the visual grammar: recitation, feeling expression, framing techniques, photography, combination of camera angles, camera movements are adopted from theatre or cinema and adapted for the context of virtual reality, thus resulting something new and "metaphysical" (Figure 11). ...
Context 5
... are usually associated to specific performing techniques or camera movements and parameters (different angles, field of view, depth of field). (Figure 11). The representation of realistic personages through virtual characters can be more complex to realize (3D modeling, rigging, animations, behaviors) in comparison to real actors. ...
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... site specific installation is an original example of media hybridization, conceived with the double purpose of explaining the masterpiece and to create a new live art (Figure 12 (Figure 12). ...
Context 7
... site specific installation is an original example of media hybridization, conceived with the double purpose of explaining the masterpiece and to create a new live art (Figure 12 (Figure 12). ...
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... graphic appearance can be characterized with a different style, for instance by a dominant color, or rendered in wireframe. Even metadata can be associated to them and queried about the interpretative sources that have been used, to let the user access specific information about the interpretative process followed ( Figure 13) [44]. ...
Context 9
... third mode, defined "Projector-based AR/Spatial AR", allows to superimpose virtual contents directly on the real world, projecting them on volumes (usually architectures, facades, objects), without the use of viewers that come between the user and the physical world. Virtual contents such as lights, images or videos are projected and overlapped to real surfaces by means of projection mapping techniques (Figure 14). From a cognitive perspective, MR is very useful to help the user to perceive and decode the space while walking through it, to identify its elements, relationships and meanings. ...

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