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Early Gameplay and setup

Early Gameplay and setup

Source publication
Conference Paper
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Physical games involving blindfolded players have a timeless appeal and the restricting of perceptual channels can be insightful for players and observers regarding embodied experience. Wireless, mobile and wearable technologies open up further opportunities for designing bodily play experiences through exploiting sensory deprivation. To better und...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... the initial explorations focused mainly on sight deprivation and working alone, the second step was to deprive more than one sense and to work in teams ( Figure 3). In the Early Gameplay Testing, the participants tried abbreviated versions of the same exercises as was done in Exploration. ...

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Citations

... We have taken a similar approach in combining breathing practices with VR in our Life Tree example. Similarly, prior work on limited control of breathing, such as the work by Elias et al. [25], "Lit2Quit" [43] and "In the same boat" [133] and previous projects around limited proprioception as a result of limited sight [149] and limited control over the ability to compensate for subconscious actions [42] have guided us in appreciating the potential of limited control of the body when aiming to create engaging experiences. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Interest in combining interactive play and the human body, using "bodily play" systems, is increasing. While these systems primarily prioritize a player's control over their bodily actions, we see intriguing possibilities in the pursuit of "limited control over the body" as an intriguing design resource for bodily play systems. In this paper, we use three of our bodily play systems to illustrate how designers can engage with limited control over the body by varying the player's degree of indirect control (for instance, via other bodily activity and external triggers). We also propose four strategies for employing limited control over the body: Exploration, Reflection, Learning and Embracement. We hope our own work and the strategies developed from it will assist designers to employ limited control over the body, ultimately helping people benefit from engaging their bodies through play.