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Dzharatitanis kingi, USNM 538133 (holotype), anterior caudal vertebra in posterior (A), right lateral (B), and anterior (C) views. Scale bar = 10 cm. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0246620.g001

Dzharatitanis kingi, USNM 538133 (holotype), anterior caudal vertebra in posterior (A), right lateral (B), and anterior (C) views. Scale bar = 10 cm. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0246620.g001

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Dzharatitanis kingi gen. et sp. nov. is based on an isolated anterior caudal vertebra (USNM 538127) from the Upper Cretaceous (Turonian) Bissekty Formation at Dzharakuduk, Uzbekistan. Phylogenetic analysis places the new taxon within the diplodocoid clade Rebbachisauridae. This is the first rebbachisaurid reported from Asia and one of the youngest...

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... 538127 is a nearly complete caudal vertebra lacking the left transverse process (Figs 1- 3). The centrum is short anteroposteriorly, with the centrum length (9.8 cm) only 55 percent the height of the anterior articular surface of the centrum (17.9 cm). ...

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