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Dung pellets in Bechan Cave, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Utah.  

Dung pellets in Bechan Cave, Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, Utah.  

Source publication
Technical Report
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More than 3,600 caves and karst resources have been identified in at least 79 units of the National Park System. In 1998, the National Park Service Geologic Resources Division initiated a servicewide inventory of paleontological resources occurring in association with these caves. The inventory documented at least 35 park areas that preserved fossi...

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... 1983, a research team visited the cave ( Davis et al., 1984). An enormous organic layer, with a volume of approxi- mately 390 cubic yards (300 cubic meters), domi- nated by dung, was discovered in Bechan Cave (Fig- ure 8). The name Bechan comes from the Navajo word for "big feces" ( Mead et al., 1986a). ...

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Citations

... Boone Formation -Indeterminate Mississippian chondrichthyan teeth have been reported from Boone Formation outcrops along the Buffalo River at BUFF (Bitting, personal commun., 2001;Santucci et al., 2001). ...
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... The Pleistocene vertebrate fossils of CAVE are not preserved in the bedrock, which is exclusively of Permian age. Pleistocene fossils are primarily preserved in the rooms of cave systems, sometimes sitting exposed on the surface of the cave floor, but more often shallowly buried in loose sediment, talus, or bat guano and sometimes encased in flowstone (Santucci et al., 2001;Graham, 2007). In many caves, Pleistocene and Holocene remains are both present, sometimes in the same deposits. ...
... Mammalia Pilosa (=Edentata = Xenarthra, in part) †Nothrotheriidae: A juvenile †Nothrotheriops shastensis specimen was collected from the cave in the 1940s (Bretz, 1949;Hill and Gillette, 1987a;Santucci et al., 2001;McDonald and Jefferson, 2008;McDonald and Morgan, 2011). This specimen is curated in the CAVE collection. ...
... Chiroptera Molossidae: Free-tailed bats, in particular Tadarida brasiliensis mexicana, constitute the most abundant vertebrate fossil specimens in Carlsbad Cavern (Baker, 1963). The cave is currently home to a large colony of this species in the Bat Cave section, and fossil evidence suggests several prior colonies of the species inhabited the Big Room and Lower Cave (Santucci et al., 2001;Jablonsky, unpubl. report to NPS, 1999). ...
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... Ichnotaxa are in bold and biotaxa represented by coprolites are in regular font. Data from Harris (1987Harris ( , 1989, Mead and Agenbroad (1992), Santucci et al. (2001), Glowiak (2007), , Mead and Swift (2012), Hunt and Lucas (2018) and Mead et al. (2020aMead et al. ( , b, 2021 469D) , consists of eight coprolites, one of which we designate A, as the holotype (Fig. 3) and the others B-I, as paratypes (Fig. 4). A is a rounded coprolite with one end forming a rounded point and the other a concave pit (Fig. 3). ...
... A large trampled coprolite was found near a pit dug by pothunters (Mead et al., , 1986bMartin, 2005). This and other large coprolites represent Mammuthocopros allenrorum produced by Columbian mammoths (Mammuthus columbi) and constitute the majority of a large latrinite with a volume of about 300 m 3 (Davis et al., , 1985Mead et al., 1984Mead et al., , 1986bMead, 1987, 1989;Santucci et al., 2001;Martin, 2005;Hunt and Lucas, 2020). This identification was initially based on morphology and the size and taxonomy of the content (Mead et al., 1986b) and subsequently confirmed by DNA analysis (Karpinski et al., 2017). ...
... Mead et al. (1984) first reported Castrocopros martini coprolites from Bechan Cave. Other coprolites pertain to Suaviocopros harrisi or were produced by Neotoma, the rabbits ?Lepus, and/or ?Sylvilagus, the horse ?Equus, Oreamnos harringtoni, and Ovis canadensis Mead et al., 1984;Mead et al., 1986b;Mead and Agenbroad, 1992;Santucci et al., 2001;Mead and Swift, 2012). ...
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... This has resulted in an incredible array of Cenozoic remains found throughout caves in the upper Redwall Formation. This includes many extinct Ice Aged Fauna, such as the Shasta Ground Sloth, Harrington Mountain Goat, Big Horn Sheep, Mountain Lion, California Condors, Dire Wolves, among many other vertebrate species, as well as pollen and twigs from a wide variety of plant species (Euler 1978, Santucci et al. 2001, Mead et al. 2020). Many of these finds range in age up to 35,000 years before present. ...
... Caves are also recognized for their potential for fossil preservation. The most important fossil records in such environments are the remains of Quaternary vertebrates incorporated to the caves at a time subsequent to their connection with the surface realm (Santucci et al. 2001;Jass and George 2010). On the other hand, fossils preserved as primary structures within the enveloping rock, i.e., those which have been preserved in the rock in which the caves are formed, are less wellknown and frequently underestimated in terms of their scientific and esthetic value (DuChene 2000; Santucci et al. 2001;Vasconcelos and Bittencourt 2018). ...
... The most important fossil records in such environments are the remains of Quaternary vertebrates incorporated to the caves at a time subsequent to their connection with the surface realm (Santucci et al. 2001;Jass and George 2010). On the other hand, fossils preserved as primary structures within the enveloping rock, i.e., those which have been preserved in the rock in which the caves are formed, are less wellknown and frequently underestimated in terms of their scientific and esthetic value (DuChene 2000; Santucci et al. 2001;Vasconcelos and Bittencourt 2018). ...
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The fossil record preserved throughout the National Park Service spans more than a billion years and is documented in at least 267 park units. The discovery, collection, study, and resource management of fossils from localities which are currently within parks sometimes predate the establishment of the National Park Service and many of the parks. Public education and interpretation at parks such as Agate Fossil Beds and Tule Springs Fossil Beds national monuments and many other designated areas include information on the rich history of paleontological field work by notable paleontologists undertaken prior to the areas being preserved as national park areas. Another important historical aspect for several dozen parks involves the conservation efforts undertaken by the public and interest groups to preserve and protect these important fossil localities. The evolution of the science and methodologies in paleontology is reflected in the resource management undertaken by the National Park Service and documented in park resource management records and archives, scientific publications, and agency policy. Today the National Park Service celebrates fossils by coordinating the National Fossil Day partnership which helps to promote the scientific and educational value of fossils.