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Dorsal fin was more erect in the two mature males, a) UERJ-MQ 86, b) UERJ-MQ 88 than in the other individuals c) mature female UERJ0MQ 95, d) immature female UERJ-MQ 96. And e and f illustrate deepening of the caudal peduncle most prominently observed in the two mature males.  

Dorsal fin was more erect in the two mature males, a) UERJ-MQ 86, b) UERJ-MQ 88 than in the other individuals c) mature female UERJ0MQ 95, d) immature female UERJ-MQ 96. And e and f illustrate deepening of the caudal peduncle most prominently observed in the two mature males.  

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Little is known about the biology of the Fraser's dolphin (Lagenodelphis hosei), which is found in tropical and subtropical oceanic waters around the world. There is, depending on age and sex, great variation in intensity and development of the components of the colour pattern and external morphological characteristics of the species. The main char...

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Context 1
... probably caused by cookie- cutter shark (Isistius brasiliensis) bites. Rostrum length varied, representing between 1.30 and 2.86% of total length. Maximum height of dorsal fin was 22 cm in a mature male (UERJ-MQ86), corresponding to 9% of its total length (Fig. 1). Dorsal fin was more erect in the two mature males than in the other individuals (Fig. 2). Flipper length varied from 10.3 to 11.3% of total length (Table ...
Context 2
... presence of a post-anal hump, as well as the deepening of the caudal peduncle in its posterior portion, were only observed in the two mature males (Fig. 2). All individuals possessed a cape, which varied from grey to dark grey. Flanks were grey and ventral surface was white. One of the mature females and the two mature males presented a cream coloration on the lower portion of ...

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