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Dominant drivers of tree species richness in forested areas worldwide
a, Driver dominance was derived for each pixel from four driver categories (that is, bioclimatic, topographic, anthropogenic and soil) and co-limitation, which represents a lack of clear dominance among the four foregoing categories. The pixel-level drivers were then aggregated by 0.5° latitudinal bins to show the percentage prevalence of dominant drivers by latitude (top left). b, The violin charts show the kernel probability density of tree species richness per ha for different drivers. Inside boxes indicate the median (line in the centre) and interquartile range (bounds of boxes). The numbers on top of the violin charts indicate the percentage of forested pixels globally that corresponds to each driver category. The red line represents the mean and 95% confidence interval of tree species richness per ha (81.1 ± 0.1) for all the 0.025° × 0.025° pixels of co-limitation. The vertical axis is on a logarithmic scale for better illustration.

Dominant drivers of tree species richness in forested areas worldwide a, Driver dominance was derived for each pixel from four driver categories (that is, bioclimatic, topographic, anthropogenic and soil) and co-limitation, which represents a lack of clear dominance among the four foregoing categories. The pixel-level drivers were then aggregated by 0.5° latitudinal bins to show the percentage prevalence of dominant drivers by latitude (top left). b, The violin charts show the kernel probability density of tree species richness per ha for different drivers. Inside boxes indicate the median (line in the centre) and interquartile range (bounds of boxes). The numbers on top of the violin charts indicate the percentage of forested pixels globally that corresponds to each driver category. The red line represents the mean and 95% confidence interval of tree species richness per ha (81.1 ± 0.1) for all the 0.025° × 0.025° pixels of co-limitation. The vertical axis is on a logarithmic scale for better illustration.

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Article
Full-text available
The latitudinal diversity gradient (LDG) is one of the most recognized global patterns of species richness exhibited across a wide range of taxa. Numerous hypotheses have been proposed in the past two centuries to explain LDG, but rigorous tests of the drivers of LDGs have been limited by a lack of high-quality global species richness data. Here we...

Citations

... While, a very less tree species richness (10 spp.) with a comparable total tree density of 255 ind. ha −1 and slightly high dominance (10.11 m 2 ha −1 ) were reported in high fire zones in tropical deciduous forests of Bhoramdeo Wildlife Sanctuary, Chhattisgarh (Jhariya et al., 2014) and are primarily driven by latitudinal gradients (Liang et al., 2022). Altered species composition, diversity, and reduced seedling density were also been reported in areas of dry deciduous forest with the shortest fire return intervals compared to forest patches with lower fire frequency in the moist deciduous forests of Nilgiri Biosphere Reserve, Western Ghats (Kodandapani et al., 2009). ...
Article
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