Context in source publication

Context 1
... research observed that there is a disproportionate distribution of foster parents between the urban and the rural. The general trend which can be observed from Table 1 is that predominantly rural provinces have less numbers of children under foster care compared to the urban provinces. The table also shows a conspicuously huge number of fostered children in Harare province. ...

Citations

... Infertility can be a push factor for considering foster care, which is thought to ease psychosocial challenges and provide companionship as a result of not being able to have their children (Muchinako, Mpeambela & Muzingili, 2018). Similarly, in a qualitative research conducted in Zimbabwe, well-off parents who cannot have their children have considered foster care (Chibwana, 2019). In the same line, research has shown that couples who want children but not of their own may consider foster care (Andersson, 2001). ...
... Uncompensated foster care was also found to be favoured by people who were religiously-oriented in Finland (Isomäki, 2002). Moreover, altruism was also seen as a key determinant for foster care where values such as caring for people in general, solidarity and social responsibility were important driving factors (Chibwana, 2019;Daniel, 2011;Delfabbro, Taplin & Bentham, 2002;Diogo & Branco, 2017;Helm, Peltier & Scovotti, 2006;Isomäki, 2002;Migliorini et al., 2018;Muchinako et al., 2018, Nsthongwana & Tanga,2018Rodger, Cummings & Leschied, 2006). Furthermore, in a study conducted in South Australia, altruistic and family-oriented drives were the major motivating force behind people's desire to become foster parents rather than religious beliefs, additional income and moral obligations (Delfabbro, Taplin & Bentham, 2002). ...
... They also noted that to be emotionally invested and provide for the child's needs, money was required. Similarly, Chibwana (2019) found in a study conducted in Zimbabwe that chronically poor foster parents were motivated because of possible benefits in terms of fees from the government alongside a love for children. Conversely, in Kirton's study of 20 female carers in 2001, "payment was found to act as (at least partial) compensation for some of the most challenging aspects of foster care and those that were low on other satisfactions" (p. ...
Thesis
Full-text available
The development of a comprehensive foster care system as an alternative to the institutionalisation of children in out-of-home care remains underdeveloped in Mauritius. With no prior studies on the perceptions of foster care in this multiethnic island state and the relatively low number of registered foster parents, this qualitative study sought to explore the perceptions of the Afro-Mauritians and Indo-Mauritians on the reality of foster care. Also, this study sought to identify factors perceived to prevent or encourage members of particular ethnic groups in fostering a child. Similarly, it aimed to understand demographic factors perceived as significant for effective foster care. Using semi-structured interviews alongside purposive sampling, 10 parents were interviewed from which 5 were of African descent and 5 of Indian descent. From the thematic analysis, national silence on foster care alongside the urgency to make foster care a working reality was advanced. Unconditional acceptance of the foster child and support to foster parents were also reported as vital. While more similarities between the two ethnic groups were uncovered, some unique reasons to start foster care and barriers to do so were also revealed by members of particular ethnic groups. Family structure, age, educational level and socioeconomic status were revealed as important demographic indicators for effective foster care. It was recommended for social workers and policy makers to fully commit towards implementing more family-oriented care provisions. Also significant is the relevance of considering ethnic belongingness as an important and equally relevant demographic marker in the multicultural Mauritian context.
... Findings from some child fosterage research in Sub-Saharan Africa (cited in, Chibwana, 2019;Coppoletta et al., 2011;McDaniel & Zulu, 1996) show no significant difference between social outcomes of fostered and non-fostered children. Evidence from most researches indicates that the fostered child's experience is dependent on certain social and cultural factors, such as relationship between biological and fostered parents, the existence of biological parents, motives of fostering, and social context of fostering ...
Thesis
Full-text available
This thesis investigated the psychological impact of African child fosterage, by examining the emotional and behavioural outcomes of this unique caregiving arrangement. The objective of this research was to examine the influence of attachment orientation on the emotional intelligence and social functioning of fostered (N=68) and non-fostered (N=161) late adolescent Nigerians. Attachment disorder has been identified as the major effect of foster care, in international foster care research. Results of studies from Western context indicate that compared to their non-fostered counterparts, adolescences that are fostered score lower in secure attachment, and are deficient in emotional intelligence and social competence. The distinctiveness of the African child fosterage practice, compared to formal foster care arrangements in the Western context, necessities a deliberate inquiry into its outcomes. Few studies have investigated the psychological impact of child fosterage in a Nigerian sample. The overview of the results in the study indicated a significant difference in three attachment orientations (secure, fearful, and preoccupied) between fostered (N=68) and non-fostered (N=161) late adolescents with exception of dismissing attachment style. Similarly, there were significant difference in emotional intelligence and social competence scores of fostered adolescents and non-fostered adolescents, confirming that fosterage could have negative impact on attachment style, emotional intelligence and social functioning. The results also indicated that ‘relationship with foster parents/carers’ mitigated the negative impact of child fosterage. As adolescents that were fostered by immediate family relatives (i.e., Sister, Grandparents, Uncle) did not differ significantly from non-fostered adolescents in secure attachment, emotional intelligence and social functioning. Ways of improving the outcomes of child fosterage are discussed. The findings from this research are useful for parenting, school counselling, and family therapy.
Article
Full-text available
Child domestic work is a hidden form of child labour driven by poverty and social norms. However, little is known about the situations of child domestic workers. This study aims to describe and analyse gender-specific working conditions, health, and educational outcomes among hidden child domestic workers (CDWs) living in third-party homes relative to married children, biological children, and other children in kinship care. Data from the 2019 Zimbabwe Multiple Indicator Cluster Survey (MICS) were analysed. Descriptive statistics and bivariable logistic regression were used to describe frequency and estimated prevalence. Directed Acyclic Graphs (DAGs) were used to identify exposures and inform the selection of covariates. Multivariable logistic regression models were fitted to estimate the effect of each exposure variable. The prevalence of CDWs was 1.5% and CDWs were mainly girls and living in much wealthier households with more educated household heads while married girls were living in much poorer households. When compared among girls themselves, being a CDW was significantly associated with having a functional disability, while married girls were more frequently engaged in hazardous working conditions. We provide the first intersectional analysis comparing work, violence, and health outcomes among CDWs, married children and other children. Child protection measures are needed to safeguard children in domestic work and marriages.
Article
Full-text available
This study sought to explore the variety of coping strategies that women employ in response to intimate partner violence. Coping strategies can help women tolerate, minimise and deal with difficult challenges or conflicts in their relationships, such as learning to be independent from their husbands and surviving trauma. Drawing on 18 in-depth interviews conducted in Mwanza, Tanzania, we examined two different coping strategies - engagement and disengagement coping - with respect to how women react to economic, emotional, physical and sexual intimate partner violence. While the choice of coping methods remains a complex issue, most women employed engagement strategies as a response to economic violence and disengagement coping for sexual violence. We explore the implications of gender and societal roles for coping decisions and analyse how access to resources may provide women with the tools to limit future violence.
Thesis
Full-text available
Children need to grow up in a loving and caring family environment for their development. In the absence of such an environment, children become vulnerable to violations of their rights, hence the need for alternative care, preferably family-based, for children deprived of their family environment. The right to appropriate alternative care for children is guaranteed under the UN Convention on the Rights of the Child of 1989 and the African Charter on the Rights and Welfare of the Child of 1990, both ratified by Tanzania in 1991 and 2003, respectively. Mainland Tanzania domesticated these treaties through the Law of the Child Act in 2009, in which the need for alternative care for children deprived of their family environment is reflected, with an emphasis on family-based alternative care rather than institutional care. However, in practice, institutional care is prevalent in Tanzania. The limited use of foster care as one of the family-based alternative care options to protect children deprived of their family environment necessitated this study that assesses the place of foster care in the continuum of child care in Mainland Tanzania. In this study, foster care, as distinct from informal traditional kinship care, refers to a form of family-based care, to be ordered and supervised by the competent social welfare authority, where a child deprived of his or her family environment is placed in the home of a carer who is selected, approved and supervised by the authority to provide such care. However, in Tanzania, foster care is understood and used in practice merely as a prerequisite for adoption rather than an independent form of alternative care as provided in the laws. On the other hand, with the so-called fit person programme, a short-term variation of foster care is applied without relating it to foster care. Therefore, the study examines the efficiency and effectiveness in practice of the legal framework regulating foster care and other forms of protection of children deprived of their family environment. By analysing the relevant legal and policy documents and conducting interviews with selected respondents, the challenges and prospects of foster care as family-based alternative care in Mainland Tanzania were unravelled in the light of the international and regional standards and principles on the right to alternative care, such as the principles of necessity and suitability. The narrow definition of foster care in the Law of the Child Act limited to care by non-relatives, lack of clarity on the objectives and uses of foster care, and lack of coherence of the Law of the Child Act and the regulations made under it stand out as the major legal challenges resulting in the limited use of foster care. Against this background, the study analyses the actual role of the social welfare officers in the protection of children, as well as child-care traditions and culture of Tanzanians, and poverty as critical practical challenges affecting the use of foster care in Tanzania. As a result, the study contends that existing campaigns to deinstitutionalise alternative care in favour of family-based care, the need for a case-by-case analysis of children’s needs, and flexibility in the practice of foster care provide prospects for a functioning foster care system in Tanzania. The study emphasises that adopting a holistic approach looking at the whole system of protection of children is essential in developing a desired foster care system as foster care cannot be a solution on its own. The study calls for a reform of the legal framework on child protection and a concretisation of the right to alternative care within the legal framework.