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Distribution of SFLO parcels in Washington circa 2007.

Distribution of SFLO parcels in Washington circa 2007.

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
Washington State Legislature tasked the School of Environmental and Forest Sciences within the College of the Environment at the University of Washington in Seattle to address a set of questions that broadly deal with the status of Washington’s small forest landowners (SFLOs) and their lands, including their current state, trends, regulatory impact...

Contexts in source publication

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... dots say they expect to sell all or part of their forest land in the next 5 years and white dots did NOT say they expect to sell land in the coming 5 years. .. Figure 40. Model coefficient plots (odds ratio form); red dots represent a decline, blue dots an increase in the odds of an alternative land use compared to ForestOrNatural category, Eastside. ...
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... coefficient plots (odds ratio form); red dots represent a decline, blue dots an increase in the odds of an alternative land use compared to ForestOrNatural category, Eastside. Figure 54. Simulated SFLO conversion acreage, by conversion type and region. ...
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... of the financial impact that riparian regulations have had on SFLOs: only respondents who have at least one application on the FREP waiting list for payment. ............ 236 Figure 74. How important are the following aspects of FREP? .................................................. 238 Figure 75. ...
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... of what went well about the Alternate Plan process, for respondents who said they have ever applied for an Alternate Plan. Figure 84. Opinions of what could be improved about the Alternate Plan process, for respondents who said they have ever applied for an Alternate Plan. ...
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... other counties contain less than 5% of parcels and owners. Figure 4 shows the geographic distribution of SFLO parcels. Statewide, 77% of small forest landowners owned less than 20 acres in 2007. ...
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... the results below, we report the table of model coefficients in the odds ratio form and also offer odds ratio plots where red dots represent a decrease in the odds of a particular land use class compared to "ForestOrNatural" and the blue dots represent an increase (Figure 39 and Figure 40). Amarginal change in the probability of a specific outcome depends on the probabilities of other alternatives (Train 2009). ...
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... also tested several parcel-level distance variables which can offer evidence of spatial 'attraction' or 'repellance'. Distance to nearest development ( Figure 43 and Figure 44) could be related to a parcel's development (and possibly a sale). ...
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... also need to emphasize that the effects presented represent marginal changes in probabilities with all other variables held constant, which is a proper way of coefficient interpretation but marginal effects of a particular sign represent a conditional relationship and are not identical to the presence of a bivariate trend relationship between predicted probabilities and the variable in question. For example, although the marginal impact of the gravity index is negative on the Westside residential development probability, a partial dependence plot of the gravity index (using the out-of-sample predicted probabilities) shows that when we see how the gravity index changes in the overall Westside sample, the estimated residential development probability in fact trends up (Figure 45), but those trends are heterogenous across Westside counties ( Figure 115). Similarly, a partial fitted trend between population density change and probability of residential development is slightly positive. ...
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... we see that Westside SFLOs who manage larger forest holdings appear to be more reluctant to both sell and convert their forest lands. Parcel road extent (in miles) is a strong predictor of sales on the Westside and we also see it as a significant predictor of residential conversion: odds of residential conversion grow by 69% for each mile of identifiable roads located on the parcel (Figure 48). Parcels with more roads are less likely to be converted to agricultural uses on the Westside (marginal effect of -109.4%, 95% CI: (-185.7, ...
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... Figure 50. Parcel forest percentage and estimated probability of residential development, validation sample, Eastside dependence plots (Figure 49, Figure 50) for two models show a consistent effect of sales and initial forest share on residential development probability. ...
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... who have had contact with the SFLO Office feel, on average, less impacted by land development issues, but the difference is not significant. (***) (***-1% level, ** 5%-level and *-10% level of significance) Figure 64 shows the frequency of topics the GP survey respondents discussed with the SFLO Office. The most frequently asked about topics are Forest Practices Applications and the Forest Stewardship Program, followed by events for landowners. ...
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... least asked about topics are road regulations and Alternate Harvest Plans. Overall, Table 38, Table 39 and Figure 64 show that SFLOs who utilize the SFLO Office tend to be more engaged with active forest management, value the income that forestry generates, and have stronger environmental ownership objectives. To explore the relationships between the topics that the SFLO Office assist SFLOs with, we ran a Multiple Correspondence Analysis on the topics that respondents tended to ask about in combination. ...
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... were also asked to rate the importance of various aspects of FREP. Figure 74 shows the distribution of respondents answers to how important various aspects of FREP are to them. Information from friends or other land owners is the least important aspect of the topics presented in the survey. ...
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... separate question asked respondents "if you have ever applied for an Alternate Plan, please indicate what could be improved about the process?" Figure 84 presents the frequency of opinions express about what respondents felt can be improved about the Alternate Plan application process. By far the most common comment was respondents wish they could have harvested more than the Alternate Plan allowed (28 respondents). ...
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... context, 41.5% of respondents said they thought the process and outcome were reasonable. Figure 84. Opinions of what could be improved about the Alternate Plan process, for respondents who said they have ever applied for an Alternate Plan. ...
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... service can also be used to link experienced landowners with newer landowners to provide advice and expertise." Figure 94. Frequency of responses to the question about the forest owner-to-owner matching service. ...
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... owners gave multiple answers to the question about the owner-to-owner matching service. As Figure 94 shows, the most common answer was that respondents were not interested at all, followed by respondents saying "I need more information." Overall, 32% of respondents expressed an interest in the hypothetical service beyond simply saying they need more information. ...
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... also note, however, that most of those who express interest in such a service still want to recover the full market value of their land. Figure 94 raises the concern that although SFLOs overwhelmingly say they want their properties to remain forested and intact, most of the respondents interested in the forest owner matching service indicate they still want to be paid the fair market value of the land. The low frequency of GP respondents who indicate they would consider selling their forests to like-minded owners below standard market prices raises the question of just how much SFLOs are willing to give up financially to keep their forests forested and intact in the future. ...