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Discomfort index classification for existing and proposed range.

Discomfort index classification for existing and proposed range.

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Recent years have seen issues related to thermal comfort gaining more momentum in tropical countries. The thermal adaptation and thermal comfort index play a significant role in evaluating the outdoor thermal comfort. In this study, the aim is to capture the thermal sensation of respondents at outdoor environment through questionnaire survey and to...

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... results proved that the respondents can adapt to a wider range of thermal conditions. Hence, a new range of tropical DI for THOM's index has been formulated based on the questionnaire data collected (Table 4). ...

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... where T is the ambient temperature in ºC and RH is the relative humidity in %. In the study of Din et al. (2014), the DI classification and range proposed would use to characterise the white clay pots with thermal comfort evaluation. Table 2 shows the criteria of DI. ...
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... In the sociodemographic section, information such as gender, age and ethnicity were requested from the respondents. In the OTC assessment section, respondents were required to express their thermal sensation, preference, acceptance, and comfort levels using established Likert scales based on the ISO 10551: "Ergonomics of The Thermal Environment --Assessment of The Influence of the Thermal Environment Using Subjective Judgment Scales" (29). ...