Direction of water flow during rainfall infiltration for composite geogrid reinforced wall

Direction of water flow during rainfall infiltration for composite geogrid reinforced wall

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In the present study, performance of geosynthetic reinforced MSE walls backfilled with locally available marginal lateritic soil at the onset of rainfall infiltration was investigated. Two different types of geosynthetics reinforcements were used. One was a conventional type of geogrids usually used in MSE walls, and the other was composite geogrid...

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... This geosynthetic material is a geocomposite of a geogrid combined to a nonwoven geotextile. Many authors demonstrated the efficiency of this type of reinforcement to dissipate pore water pressure developed inside the reinforced zone (Portelinha et al., 2013, Bui Van et al. 2017, Portelinha and Zornberg, 2017, Yang et al., 2018, Razeghi et al., 2019, Bhattacherjee and Viswanadham 2019, Albino et al., 2020, Vibha and Divya, 2021, Yoo et al. 2022. Meanwhile, some of these authors the adverse capillary break effect on unsaturated soil-geosynthetic interfaces, halting the wetting front, and leading to positive PWP accumulated at the interface between the soil and the underlying geotextile. ...
Article
Geosynthetic-reinforced soil (GRS) walls using marginal soils can operate under unsaturated conditions depending on climate conditions and drainage inside the reinforced zone. Geocomposite reinforcements have been suggested to act as internal drainage layers, but their hydraulic behavior can also be strongly affected by climate conditions. Numerical analyses were conducted to observe the impact of four distinct tropical climate conditions (arid, semi-arid, humid subtropical and humid tropical) on suction profiles and stability of reinforced soil walls constructed using geogrid and geocomposite reinforcements. The climate simulation involved the incorporation of a soil-atmosphere interaction on water balance and on the unsaturated transient infiltration. Results indicate the GRS walls can operate under relatively high suction levels under arid climates in which cumulative evaporation overcomes infiltration. Any climate that has rainy seasons with consecutive rainfalls with intensities close to the infiltration capacity of soil and/or monthly cumulative precipitation higher than 200 mm/day led to critical conditions in terms of soil water saturation and stability. Under unsaturated conditions of soil, the drainage effectiveness of geocomposites is significantly reduced and adverse capillary break effects become critical.
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Chapter
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Chapter
The land scarcity has built up the pressure on the engineers to bring a cost-effective and time-saving solution to utilize the ground with poor strength as a foundation bed for various structures. With the recent progress in the area of ground reinforcing techniques using geosynthetics, the extensive usage of geotextile materials as a reinforcing element in the soil to strengthen the load-bearing capacity of the soil mass and reducing the anticipated settlement of the footing pushes the researchers to evolve new methods to maximize the advantages received from the reinforced earth beds. In the above context, the provision of reinforcing layers with wraparound ends has brought additional improvement in the load settlement behavior of a strip footing resting over such reinforced soil mass but this recently developed technique lacks the appropriate guidelines/recommendations for the geometrical configuration parameters of the reinforcing layer to maximize the benefit from the reinforcing layer. Given the above, a comprehensive numerical study has been conducted to propose some recommendations on the geometrical configurations of the reinforcing layers. Furthermore, this study also investigates the influence of the geogrid–soil interface on the load-settlement response of the reinforced bed under vertical footing load. From the findings of the study, it is concluded that the width of the geogrid layers, governs the overall load-bearing capacity of the reinforced soil mass system, besides it, also suggests an optimum width of the geogrid layers, which equals 1.5 times the width of the footing should be used to maximize the effective utilization of the wraparound technique. Furthermore, it was also noted that appropriate assessment of the interface between soil and geogrid may bring an optimized design of the reinforced soil mass as a foundation bed for the footings.