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Different stages of supply chain integration 

Different stages of supply chain integration 

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Purpose – This paper seeks to concentrate on the question whether any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments that have taken place in the area of Supply Chain Management. Starting from an analysis of existing literature, it is intended that different modes of Supply Chain integ...

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... the emerging field of supply chain management in a health service context as a starting point. In the next section, first an overview is presented of developments, which have taken place in the area of supply chain management. In doing so, we concentrate on the question if any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments that have taken place. Starting from this comparative analysis, different modes of supply chain integration will be discussed. In doing so, the lessons learned from the studies presented in this special issue will be summarized in section four and placed into the perspective of future research that can be considered as necessary. From a historical perspective, during the last four decades the focus within industrial companies has gradually shifted from a strong orientation on individual processes towards a chain orientation. In the sixties and seventies of the previous century, manufacturing companies considered the management and control of individual processes as a necessity in order to be competitive. During this era, main stream research in the area of operations management resulted in many mathematical models and tools which strongly contributed to our insight and understanding of the planning and control of operating processes in a manufacturing environment. Without doubt, the increased possibilities of information and communication technologies have enhanced the shifting focus of companies in the late nineties of the previous century. Especially the usage of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software has been the driving force behind the strong focus of manufacturing companies to control goods flows in a more integrated way. ERP systems are software packages designed to integrate, standardise and automate processes within organisations and throughout their value chains. This is achieved by a collection of modules linked through one central database from which all modules draw, manipulate and update data. The promises of ERP systems are clear and convincing: managers can make better-informed decisions, communication costs are reduced and firms become more integrated and coherent (Davenport, 1998; Boonstra, 2006; Dezdar and Sulaiman, 2009). Numerous studies have been performed on integrated planning systems (Akkermans and Helden, 2002) Mirrored by developments in practice, mainstream research in the field of Operations Management in the eighties and nineties concentrated on the question how sub optimisation with respect to the control of goods flows within companies can be avoided. Co-ordination between different planning levels, the use of master production schedule and the introduction of planning and control frameworks are some illustrative examples of research items, which are studied extensively during this period (Bertrand et al. , 1990). During the last ten years, a considerable amount of studies has emphasized the importance of supply chain management for companies (Croom et al. , 2000). Both in theory and in practice it is widely recognized nowadays that by integrating information and materials flows throughout the entire supply chain, both the internal and external performance of supply chain partners can be improved significantly. Many authors have remarked, however, that the supply chain management philosophy not only receives considerable attention from the field of logistics and operations management but also from other areas (Burgress et al. , 2006). Clearly, the origin of supply chain management is of a multidisciplinary nature and stems from different areas such as strategic management, marketing, and organizational behaviour (Croom et al. , 2000). It is not surprising therefore, that the phenomenon of supply chain management is studied from several different perspectives and, by doing so, several aspects have emerged as being of importance when trying to establish integrated supply chains (Harland, 1996; Lee, 2002; Boone and Ganesham, 2007). Despite the variety of perspectives, the elimination of waste and an emphasis on improving performance by coordinating supply chains are generally considered the core issues of supply chain management relationships. This focus is reflected in the many studies on the exchange of information, materials and products (Jarett, 1998; Chen and Paulraj, 2004; Cooper and Tracey, 2005). The question of how to optimise these exchange processes seems to be well-covered in contemporary literature and is illustrated by numerous studies on supply chain integration, logistics postponement and the role of information technology (Croom et al. , 2000). Additionally, several studies have suggested that many potential barriers relating to trust need to be levelled when implementing supply chain partnering (Harland, 1996; Mentzer, 2004). The phenomenon of supply chain management therefore, is also closely linked to issues of collaboration, trust and the atmosphere of the relationship. Figure 1 presents a schematic overview of the developments, which have taken place with respect to the focus and area, manufacturing companies have concentrated on during the last decades. The phases depicted in Figure 1 should be considered as a development on a macro level. Obviously, many individual companies still are in one of the early phases of supply chain integration. To a certain extent, the developments outlined above also account for the health care sector. From an Operations Management perspective, the focus in the health care sector originally also concentrated on optimising individual processes. Well-known examples are the application of operations research techniques to optimise inventory levels of drugs and methods for optimising the ordering process of care-related products and pharmaceuticals. Comparable to developments in the industrial sector, it is widely acknowledged nowadays that information and communication technologies can play a significant role in improving health supply chains and it will be of no surprise that many health care organisations have started up projects in the field of health supply chains (Schneller et al. , 2006). Recent studies show that a significant portion of the costs associated with supply chains in the health care sector can be reduced by implementing effective supply chains (Burns, 2000; Dacosta-Claro, 2002; Oliveira and Pinto, 2005). There are some indications however, that the health care sector is behind the industry sector with respect to implementing supply chain management practices. The application of supply chain management practices in the health care sector not only relates to physical goods like drugs, pharmaceuticals, medical devices and health aids but also to the flow of patients (Beier, 1995). Nowadays, patient logistics is an emerging field in the area of operations and supply chain management encompassing all planning and control decisions aimed at matching supply and demand throughout the health care supply chain. In practice, patient logistics often concentrates on decisions regarding the variability and complexity of demand within a hospital but obviously, also important coordination issues exist between health care organisations. Similar to manufacturing companies, many optimisation questions in health care relate to the problem how a high resource utilization can be matched with a high customer service level. Not surprisingly, within the area of patient logistics also a strong emphasis exists nowadays on improving performance by more integrated health care supply chains (Brennan, 1998). The question how this integration can be achieved best still is a relatively uncovered field in the area of supply chain management however, and starting from this question there are only limited academic studies addressing the challenges unique to the health care setting. Similar to supply chain management in a manufacturing setting, health supply chains can be characterized by different modes of integration: . Integration and co-ordination of processes. . Integration and co-ordination of information flows. . Integration and co-ordination of planning processes. . Integration of intra- and inter-organisational processes. . Integration of market-approach. . Integration of market-development. Related to health service providers, supply chain management often refers to the information, supplies and finances involved with the acquisition and movement of goods and services from the supplier to the end user in order to enhance clinical outcomes while controlling costs. In doing so supply chain management puts a strong emphasis on the integration of processes. Within the healthcare sector these processes might refer to physical products like pharmaceuticals, medical devices and health aids but also to processes associated with the flow of patients. In both cases the basic rationale of a supply chain management approach is founded in the belief that intensive co-ordination and integration between operational processes might lead to a better health supply chain performance. Information technology and the deployment of e-business clearly are closely linked to the co-ordination and integration of operational processes. Many studies have advocated the important role information technology plays in supply chain practices (Breen and Crawford, 2005; Harland and Caldwell, 2007) and it will be of no surprise therefore that many studies on health care supply chains focus on the role of e-business technologies across hospital supply chains (Siau et al. , 2002). Similar to the co-ordination and integration of operational processes, information technology in the health sector is related to both physical products as well as to the flow of patients within and between health service organisations (Lowell and Celler, 1998). Examples of information technology-oriented applications can be found in the area of procurement, inventory control and materials planning. The ...
Context 2
... management. In doing so, we concentrate on the question if any parallels can be found between the industrial sector and health care services with respect to the developments that have taken place. Starting from this comparative analysis, different modes of supply chain integration will be discussed. In doing so, the lessons learned from the studies presented in this special issue will be summarized in section four and placed into the perspective of future research that can be considered as necessary. From a historical perspective, during the last four decades the focus within industrial companies has gradually shifted from a strong orientation on individual processes towards a chain orientation. In the sixties and seventies of the previous century, manufacturing companies considered the management and control of individual processes as a necessity in order to be competitive. During this era, main stream research in the area of operations management resulted in many mathematical models and tools which strongly contributed to our insight and understanding of the planning and control of operating processes in a manufacturing environment. Without doubt, the increased possibilities of information and communication technologies have enhanced the shifting focus of companies in the late nineties of the previous century. Especially the usage of enterprise resource planning (ERP) software has been the driving force behind the strong focus of manufacturing companies to control goods flows in a more integrated way. ERP systems are software packages designed to integrate, standardise and automate processes within organisations and throughout their value chains. This is achieved by a collection of modules linked through one central database from which all modules draw, manipulate and update data. The promises of ERP systems are clear and convincing: managers can make better-informed decisions, communication costs are reduced and firms become more integrated and coherent (Davenport, 1998; Boonstra, 2006; Dezdar and Sulaiman, 2009). Numerous studies have been performed on integrated planning systems (Akkermans and Helden, 2002) Mirrored by developments in practice, mainstream research in the field of Operations Management in the eighties and nineties concentrated on the question how sub optimisation with respect to the control of goods flows within companies can be avoided. Co-ordination between different planning levels, the use of master production schedule and the introduction of planning and control frameworks are some illustrative examples of research items, which are studied extensively during this period (Bertrand et al. , 1990). During the last ten years, a considerable amount of studies has emphasized the importance of supply chain management for companies (Croom et al. , 2000). Both in theory and in practice it is widely recognized nowadays that by integrating information and materials flows throughout the entire supply chain, both the internal and external performance of supply chain partners can be improved significantly. Many authors have remarked, however, that the supply chain management philosophy not only receives considerable attention from the field of logistics and operations management but also from other areas (Burgress et al. , 2006). Clearly, the origin of supply chain management is of a multidisciplinary nature and stems from different areas such as strategic management, marketing, and organizational behaviour (Croom et al. , 2000). It is not surprising therefore, that the phenomenon of supply chain management is studied from several different perspectives and, by doing so, several aspects have emerged as being of importance when trying to establish integrated supply chains (Harland, 1996; Lee, 2002; Boone and Ganesham, 2007). Despite the variety of perspectives, the elimination of waste and an emphasis on improving performance by coordinating supply chains are generally considered the core issues of supply chain management relationships. This focus is reflected in the many studies on the exchange of information, materials and products (Jarett, 1998; Chen and Paulraj, 2004; Cooper and Tracey, 2005). The question of how to optimise these exchange processes seems to be well-covered in contemporary literature and is illustrated by numerous studies on supply chain integration, logistics postponement and the role of information technology (Croom et al. , 2000). Additionally, several studies have suggested that many potential barriers relating to trust need to be levelled when implementing supply chain partnering (Harland, 1996; Mentzer, 2004). The phenomenon of supply chain management therefore, is also closely linked to issues of collaboration, trust and the atmosphere of the relationship. Figure 1 presents a schematic overview of the developments, which have taken place with respect to the focus and area, manufacturing companies have concentrated on during the last decades. The phases depicted in Figure 1 should be considered as a development on a macro level. Obviously, many individual companies still are in one of the early phases of supply chain integration. To a certain extent, the developments outlined above also account for the health care sector. From an Operations Management perspective, the focus in the health care sector originally also concentrated on optimising individual processes. Well-known examples are the application of operations research techniques to optimise inventory levels of drugs and methods for optimising the ordering process of care-related products and pharmaceuticals. Comparable to developments in the industrial sector, it is widely acknowledged nowadays that information and communication technologies can play a significant role in improving health supply chains and it will be of no surprise that many health care organisations have started up projects in the field of health supply chains (Schneller et al. , 2006). Recent studies show that a significant portion of the costs associated with supply chains in the health care sector can be reduced by implementing effective supply chains (Burns, 2000; Dacosta-Claro, 2002; Oliveira and Pinto, 2005). There are some indications however, that the health care sector is behind the industry sector with respect to implementing supply chain management practices. The application of supply chain management practices in the health care sector not only relates to physical goods like drugs, pharmaceuticals, medical devices and health aids but also to the flow of patients (Beier, 1995). Nowadays, patient logistics is an emerging field in the area of operations and supply chain management encompassing all planning and control decisions aimed at matching supply and demand throughout the health care supply chain. In practice, patient logistics often concentrates on decisions regarding the variability and complexity of demand within a hospital but obviously, also important coordination issues exist between health care organisations. Similar to manufacturing companies, many optimisation questions in health care relate to the problem how a high resource utilization can be matched with a high customer service level. Not surprisingly, within the area of patient logistics also a strong emphasis exists nowadays on improving performance by more integrated health care supply chains (Brennan, 1998). The question how this integration can be achieved best still is a relatively uncovered field in the area of supply chain management however, and starting from this question there are only limited academic studies addressing the challenges unique to the health care setting. Similar to supply chain management in a manufacturing setting, health supply chains can be characterized by different modes of integration: . Integration and co-ordination of processes. . Integration and co-ordination of information flows. . Integration and co-ordination of planning processes. . Integration of intra- and inter-organisational processes. . Integration of market-approach. . Integration of market-development. Related to health service providers, supply chain management often refers to the information, supplies and finances involved with the acquisition and movement of goods and services from the supplier to the end user in order to enhance clinical outcomes while controlling costs. In doing so supply chain management puts a strong emphasis on the integration of processes. Within the healthcare sector these processes might refer to physical products like pharmaceuticals, medical devices and health aids but also to processes associated with the flow of patients. In both cases the basic rationale of a supply chain management approach is founded in the belief that intensive co-ordination and integration between operational processes might lead to a better health supply chain performance. Information technology and the deployment of e-business clearly are closely linked to the co-ordination and integration of operational processes. Many studies have advocated the important role information technology plays in supply chain practices (Breen and Crawford, 2005; Harland and Caldwell, 2007) and it will be of no surprise therefore that many studies on health care supply chains focus on the role of e-business technologies across hospital supply chains (Siau et al. , 2002). Similar to the co-ordination and integration of operational processes, information technology in the health sector is related to both physical products as well as to the flow of patients within and between health service organisations (Lowell and Celler, 1998). Examples of information technology-oriented applications can be found in the area of procurement, inventory control and materials planning. The application of electronic patient record systems is also a well- known example of integrated information-technology being implemented in health systems across the world. Although many studies have reported important ...

Citations

... In today's highly competitive environment, pharmaceutical organizations must excel at operational performance and identify areas for improvement. Operational performance in the supply chain refers to the activities of the supply chain that meet end-customer requirements for product availability, optimal cost, quality service, delivery reliability, and flexibility in delivering services [12][13][14][15]. An organization's overall operational improvements depend on the performance of individual supply chain facilities and their willingness to integrate and collaborate with all supply chain firms [16]. ...
Article
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Background: Information is crucial in enhancing partnership, reducing uncertainties and inventory costs, improving order fulfillment, and increasing customer satisfaction. However, there is a scantiness of studies on how information sharing affects pharmaceutical supply chain practices and performance. Hence, this study aimed to examine the mediating effect of information sharing between supply chain integration and operational performance. Method: We conducted an analytical cross-sectional study complemented with a qualitative assessment between May and July 2021. The study populations (n = 343) were selected employees working at the Ethiopian pharmaceutical supply agency's head office and selected hubs. The quantitative data were collected by self-administered five-point Likert-scale questions and analyzed using SPSS®-version 23. The mediation effect was determined using sequential linear regression based on the Baron and Kenny stepwise approach. A 95% confidence interval and a p-value less than 5% were used to determine statistical significance. We gathered the qualitative data through in-depth face-to-face interviews with nine key informants and analyzed them using a thematic analysis technique. Results: Among 320 completed questionnaires returned (with a response rate of 93%), we used 288 in the analysis. Of the respondents, 97 (33.7%) disagreed that information sharing with the agency is simplified. One hundred seventeen (40.6%) disagreed that customers share information via an online system. Most respondents (76.4%) agreed that internal integration in the agency reduced total order time. Information sharing (β = 0.270, p < 0.001), customer integration (β = 0.265, p < 0.001), and internal integration (β = 0.151, p < 0.001) were predictor variables that had a direct positive effect on operational performance. Information sharing posited a partially mediating role between customer integration and operational performance with β = 0.136 at p < 0.001. Data quality problems, human-resource-related issues, and natural and human-made calamities were the major challenges affecting information sharing and the overall supply chain practices. Conclusion: Customer integration, internal integration, and information sharing influenced operational performance positively. Although coordination among the units in the agency is reasonable, there was a lack of communication and quick response from partners, as well as data quality problems and the absence of an automation system in most health facilities. The key informants suggested end-to-end supply systems connections with partners through Enterprise Resource Planning and other means.
... Integration in organizations, i.e. the coordination and alignment of tasks, is widely promoted as a means of improving hospital performance (Drupsteen et al., 2013;Kodner and Spreeuwenberg, 2002;Lega et al., 2013). There is consensus that concepts such as supply chain management, lean strategies and other operations management theories can contribute to the improvement of hospital performance (Aronsson et al., 2011;Borges et al., 2019;De Vries and Huijsman, 2011;Litvak et al., 2008;Ludwig et al., 2010;Van Merode et al., 2004a, b;Villa et al., 2009). This is considered important to meet a broadly felt need to improve the quality, accessibility and affordability of healthcare systems (Borges et al., 2019) in general and hospitals in particular, which form a major cost item in the healthcare system (Morgan and Astolfi, 2015). ...
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Purpose This study explores how a hospital works, which is important for further enhancing hospital performance. Following the introduction of a Hospital Planning Centre (HPC), changes are explored in a hospital in terms of integration (the coordination and alignment of tasks), differentiation (the extent to which tasks are segmented into subsystems), rules, coordination mechanisms and hospital performance. Design/methodology/approach A case study was conducted examining the hospital’s social network, rules, coordination mechanisms and performance both before and after the introduction of the HPC. All planning and execution tasks for surgery patients were studied using a naturalistic inquiry and mixed-method approach. Findings After the introduction of the HPC, the overall network structure and coordination mechanisms and coordination mechanisms remained largely the same. Integration and certain rules changed for specific planning tasks. Differentiation based on medical discipline remained. The number of local rules decreased and hospital-wide rules increased, and these remained largely in people’s minds. Coordination mechanisms remained largely unchanged, primarily involving mutual adjustment and standardization of work both before and after the introduction of the HPC. Overall, the hospital’s performance did not change substantially. The findings suggest that integration seems to “emerge” instead of being designed. Hospitals could benefit, we argue, from a more conscious system-wide approach that includes collective learning and information sharing. Originality/value This exploratory study provides in-depth insight into how a hospital works, yielding important knowledge for further research and the enhancement of hospital performance.
... SC creativity helps achieve SC performance by generating successful consumer value [13-and efficiency of care service delivery, and improved quality care are made possible by innovative advanced IT technologies [16][17][18]. This study proposes a framework for validating how SC innovation can help organizations achieve their goals by increasing SC efficiency, improving vendor cooperation, and implementing effective quality management (QM) practices [19][20][21]. The information gathered during the research came from hospital procurement departments [8,22,23]. ...
... Within the healthcare SCM, physical products, financial products, and knowledge products are the three types of flows [3,20,21]. For patients' needs and care, physical flow customizes products and services. ...
... Patient logistics as a field in the area of operations and supply chain management covers all planning and control decisions aimed at matching supply and demand throughout the entire healthcare supply chain, in particular the coordination of activities between healthcare organisations [5]. ...
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The principal task of national healthcare systems is to provide health services that are safe, accessible, high-quality and people-oriented. To ensure the continuity of healthcare, support activities related to patient transfer and logistics are necessary. Effective implementation of transport processes is a factor affecting the possibility of medical intervention, in terms of both planned and life-saving care. The reliability of the healthcare supply chain is a key factor in patient health. In our research, we have used the method of a single case study of a public regional hospital in Poland providing comprehensive medical services. The aim of the research is to identify the factors that affect the reliability of the healthcare supply chain in relation to the interhospital air transport of patients. Our qualitative research using process mapping reveals what factors affect the reliability of interhospital medical air transport. The analysis of 100 interhospital medical air transport cases has allowed us to create a general procedure related to the movement of patients between the facilities of the healthcare system in Poland. Our research shows that the key factor of reliability is the coherent and integrated cooperation of institutions involved in transport processes.
... Healthcare and domotic share various integration and coordination aspects in their processes such as information flow, organizational processes, market development, integration of inter and intra-organizational processes, and market approaches. For health and domotic services management, coordinated integration of processes is necessary due to the relationship between patients and providers of the smart wearables used to monitor their health, increase comfort, and save energy at home [16,17]. ...
... In the activity dependency graph, indirect interaction can be modeled by additional fictitious activities, although this approach makes this representation complex. A more suitable type of representation is Petri nets [16,74,75], where there is a clear distinction between two types of nodes, in activities (transitions) and partitioned storage space (places), as well as their dependency relationships that indicate the flow of information to or from the medium. ...
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... Analysis of referrals has shown that Vula enables a number of interventions, the likes of which have previously been demonstrated to be associated with improved referral processes. It facilitates direct communication between the referring doctor and the relevant specialist, [23] using an interactive medium that can share images and is compliant with privacy legislation. [24] It provides case-based ongoing medical education and enables the screening of referrals for completeness, appropriateness and urgency. ...
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Background. In the context of a shortage of medical specialists, a medical referral app, designed for use on smartphones, was launched in 2014 for use by doctors in the public health service in South Africa. Objectives. As this is a novel intervention, with potential to have an impact on the use of scarce resources, and because not much was known about the use of the app, a descriptive study was undertaken to assess its adoption in Western Cape Government Health (WCGH) facilities. Methods. Usage data of the app in WCGH facilities, in terms of referral and user numbers, were obtained from the date of its introduction in 2014. In addition, all the referrals to WCGH facilities for July 2019, stripped of any identifying data of patients or doctors, were analysed for origin, destination, outcome and response times. Descriptive statistics were used to analyse the data. Results. Use of the app grew rapidly from 40 referrals per quarter to 16 437 per quarter after 5 years in use, with a cumulative total of 95 381 referrals. In July 2019, active users of the system included 913 sending doctors and 298 receiving doctors, representing 20 medical specialties. The senders and receivers were representative of every level in the healthcare system, from clinic to tertiary hospital. In July 2019, a total of 5 941 referrals were sent by means of the app to public facilities in Western Cape Province. Of the referrals, 80% were classified as acute and 20% as non-urgent. The referral outcomes included 51% accepted for transfer, 19% accepted for a specialist appointment, and 13% concluded with advice alone without the need for a specialist appointment or patient transfer – this category accounted for 28% of non-urgent referrals and 9% of acute referrals. In 50% of referrals, advice was given to the referring doctor, either as an additional or the only outcome. The median response times were 9 minutes for acute referrals and 19 minutes for non-urgent referrals. Conclusions. This study documents the scale-up of a mobile phone consultation and referral app from pilot phase to significant growth in use across a resource-constrained healthcare system. In a large proportion of cases, advice was given to the referring doctor by means of the app, frequently obviating the need for a specialist appointment or patient transfer. This finding demonstrates that a mobile app has the potential to reduce the need for face-to-face specialist visits, thereby improving the use of scarce medical resources.
... There are several problems associated with HSC like variability and unpredictability of patient profile and high demand of care, integrated planning systems between patient flows and different health service organization, reduction of waste, unnecessary cost elimination while improving the quality (Bourlakis et al., 2011;de Vries & Huijsman, 2011;Wieser, 2011;Battini et al., 2014). Usually, HSCs maintain high levels of stock to provide 100% service level. ...
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The black swan event caused by the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) has majorly exposed the vulnerabilities of the supply chain of many of the firms. However, healthcare sector is one of the significant areas which majorly got disrupted during this pandemic event. The majority of the studies focus on the reviews on supply chain disruption modelling to analyse the risk and their effect on supply chains. This study provides a systemic literature review of various supply chain disruption models in the healthcare sector, analyses them based on different parameters identified from the literature. Some of our key findings include (1) analysis of quantitative and analytical modelling approaches used for dealing with disruption in healthcare sector; (2) managerial implications that derive potential future research avenues and insights for practitioners in the domain of healthcare supply chain disruption in post-pandemic era to improve international competitiveness and operational excellence.
... The low level of implementation seen in this study has also contributed to the inaccessibility and unavailability of basic health commodities in these community pharmacies, this is also seen in the review conducted by Jan de Veris, (2011) where he reported that many health care organizations have recognized the importance of adopting supply chain management practices yet the application of techniques, methods and best practices originally developed in an industrial setting is often problematic (Vries & Huijsman, 2011). This study did not observe any challenge in the application of Supply Chain Management. ...
... Supply chain management has recently focused on the manufacturing sector and the healthcare system, specifical hospitals. The term "hospital supply chain" refers to "information, supplies, and finances related to the acquisition and movement of goods and services from the supplier to the end-user to improve clinical outcomes while controlling costs" [1]. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
In recent decades, supply chain management implementation has evolved as a discipline, resulting in a growing number of issues, methods, and technology including in the hospital area. Specifically, Hospital Supply Chain Management (HSCM) is a supply chain management that focuses on minimizing hospital costs and improving hospital services. The entire system in the hospital, starting from drugs or medical devices from distributors to patients with or without undergoing the treatment process at the hospital where the presence of technology helps integrate the entire process. SCM in hospitals leads to efficiency in many aspects. However, gaps are found by dividing state of the art into issue, method, and technology used in previous studies. This study aims to identify gaps that exist so that there is a direction for further research. The results of the present paper point to gaps, which indicate that more research works are required.
... Ponomarov and Holcomb (2009, p.131) define supply chain resilience as "the chain's ability to prepare for unexpected events and respond to disruptions by recovering business continuity at the desired level to ensure business continuity". Resilience is a fundamental aspect in the healthcare supply chain due to the criticality of their services and the vital consequences that unexpected disruptions may cause (Achour and Price, 2010;Achour et al., 2011;De Vries and Huijsman, 2011). One way to understand resilience is through resilience capabilities (Brusset and Teller, 2017). ...
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Purpose The importance of a lean health-care supply chain is increasingly discussed. However, it is still not very clear how lean practices relate to resilience capabilities, as there are synergies and divergences between them. This study aims at identifying the relationship between lean practices and resilience capabilities in the health-care supply chain. Design/methodology/approach This study conducted a scoping review based on five databases, which allowed the content analysis of 44 articles. Such analysis allowed the verification of trends and volume of studies on this topic. Further, the descriptive numerical and thematic analyses enabled the proposition of a conceptual framework, relating the adoption of lean practices to the development of resilience capabilities according to the tiers of the health-care supply chain in different value streams. Findings Three research directions were derived from this scoping review: empirical validation of the contribution of lean practices to resilience capabilities in the health-care supply chain; systemic implementation of lean practices across tier levels of the health-care supply chain; and complementary approaches to lean implementation toward a more resilient health-care supply chain. Practical implications The understanding of these relationships provides health-care managers arguments to prioritize the application of lean practices to improve desired resilience capabilities in the entire health-care supply chain. Originality/value To the best of the authors’ knowledge, there is no similar study in the literature.