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Development of the Neochetina population one year after release. Left axis is total estimated tonnes (fresh weight) of Water Hyacinth in the lake; right axis is mean no. of Weevils per m 2 . 

Development of the Neochetina population one year after release. Left axis is total estimated tonnes (fresh weight) of Water Hyacinth in the lake; right axis is mean no. of Weevils per m 2 . 

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Classical biological control –or biocontrol- is a form of pest management comprising the release of specialized natural enemies (biocontrol agents) of an exotic pest. Classical biocontrol agents are scientifically selected from among the natural enemies the pest has in its native region. However biological control is firmly resisted in many countri...

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... size) and mat consistency (the strength given by the chains of interwoven clones) have dropped significantly (Table 1). Weevil populations have grown steadily throughout the lake as well (Figure 4) (unpublished). ...

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... For the separate physical control, despite being used widely in several countries, only few cases (9 countries out of 23) were successful while, the chemical control has not been too much adopted, because it's costly, harmful for the environment, and forbidden in some countries (Cabrera Walsh et al. (2017)). As shown in Figure 9, despite its negative impact, and being adopted only in few countries, the chemical control was effective. ...
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