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Detection of rotavirus in children of different age and sex groups 

Detection of rotavirus in children of different age and sex groups 

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In the present study 220 stool samples collected from diarrheic children admitted to different hospitals and nursing homes of Uttar Pradesh and Uttarakhand were screened for rotavirus. Of 220 diarrheic samples screened 46 samples were found to be positive for rotavirus by RNA PAGE. All the isolates exhibited 4-2-3-2 migration pattern suggesting gro...

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... the RNA PAGE positive samples exhibited 4-2-3-2 migration pattern (Zone I, II, III, IV) suggesting group A rotavirus [1]. The results showed that 31 of 135 (22.97 %) male children were found positive whereas rotavirus was detected in 15 of 85 (17.64 %) samples of female children (Table 2). Higher susceptibility of male children to rotavirus infection has also been reported by previous research groups [5,19]. ...
Context 2
... wise susceptibility was also evaluated. Children below 1 year of age (89.13 %) were found to be more susceptible to rota- virus infection (Table 2). Similar results were recorded by other research groups, [10,19] where children between 6 and 24 months were found to be more susceptible. ...

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... This is in contrast with the data reported from Vellore [8] and Hyderabad. [9] Those studies have shown only long-arm patterns and none of the short arm or mixed type. We observed higher disease severity with long electropherotypes, similar to our own observation in past from western Maharashtra. ...
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