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Descriptive statistics of survey respondents 

Descriptive statistics of survey respondents 

Citations

... One needs to be reminded that even though the expatriate population in the UAE exceeds the national population by 90%, they are essentially considered as "guests" or "social citizens" because judicial citizenship is only a rare occasion granted by rulers (Wang, 2015). Hence, it is not unusual for the UAE government to aim at sustaining its remarkable economic growth and attaining its future goal to establish itself as a global actor in the knowledge-driven world with its own youth. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
The chapter presents the case of the teaching English as a foreign language (TEFL) program at Sultan Qaboos University (SQU) as an exemplary program that has been successful to gain recognition from the US. The chapter begins with describing the actions taken by the program that led to the success in obtaining the recognition from the American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages (ACTFL). To give a full picture of the process, the SQU program was described, elaborating the six key assessments developed to provide evidence that its candidates were meeting the ACTFL standards. It has been stressed that the process of accreditation has led to creating a climate for accreditation with the need to focus on evidence and assessment across all areas of the college and programs. The chapter also points out to the cognitive and organizational restructuring that happened at all the levels. The chapter closes with challenges that faced the program in gaining recognition from ACTFL.
... One needs to be reminded that even though the expatriate population in the UAE exceeds the national population by 90%, they are essentially considered as "guests" or "social citizens" because judicial citizenship is only a rare occasion granted by rulers (Wang, 2015). Hence, it is not unusual for the UAE government to aim at sustaining its remarkable economic growth and attaining its future goal to establish itself as a global actor in the knowledge-driven world with its own youth. ...
Chapter
Full-text available
In less than five decades, from offering formal education only in a few schools to a small tribal community to providing a selection of three public and approximately 100 private higher education institutions to the citizens of seven emirates creates a unique context in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). It is an evolution that corresponds with its remarkable economic growth. Quality assurance of diverse higher educational institutions requires complex schemes to ensure their fitness for purpose, while perhaps development and enhancement aspects need time to mature. The quality of the education is especially important because the UAE yearns for the diversified and knowledge-based economy; one that is led by its own citizens whose contribution to the workforce is currently less than 10%. This chapter highlights contextual complexities in the UAE that might have direct and/or indirect impacts on the quality experiences in the higher education sector, with proposed recommendations.
Article
The experiences of migrant workers in the Arab Gulf States tend to be understood through narratives of victimization. This article aims to problematize such narratives through an analysis of three short stories set in the Gulf by Filipina-American writer Mia Alvar from her debut collection In the Country (2015). Mapping out ways in which these stories depart from narratives that revolve around themes of exploitation and exclusion, the article demonstrates that fiction can critically engage with the tension between the need to represent and make visible the reality of migrant experiences in the Gulf, and the need to question the essentialism and inflexibility through which they tend to be framed. Using the insights of recent anthropological and ethnographic research on the Gulf’s non-citizen population, I argue that Alvar’s stories both expose the structural inequality that facilitates victimization and pave the way for a more nuanced understanding of migrant experiences in the Gulf.