Fig 3 - uploaded by Wendy Zhou
Content may be subject to copyright.
Depth to groundwater table for the State of Florida with values from 0 to 203 cm  

Depth to groundwater table for the State of Florida with values from 0 to 203 cm  

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
Florida’s aquifer system exhibits spatially variable hydrogeological characteristics including shallow depth to aquifer and karst features. These characteristics contribute to groundwater vulnerability to nitrogen contamination and thus warranting vulnerability studies that allow zonation of areas into different levels of susceptibility to contamin...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Elevated levels of nitrate (NO3) in groundwater systems pose a serious risk to human populations and natural ecosystems. As part of an effort to remediate NO3 contamination in irrigated stream-aquifer systems, this study elucidates agricultural and environmental parameters and processes that govern NO3 fate and transport at the regional (500 km2),...
Article
Full-text available
Crop yields in sub-Saharan Africa remain stagnant at 1 ton ha(-1) , and 260 million people lack access to adequate food resources. Order-of-magnitude increases in fertilizer use are seen as a critical step in attaining food security. This increase represents an unprecedented input of nitrogen (N) to African ecosystems and will likely be accompanied...
Article
Full-text available
The dolomites of the Middle Permian Qixia Formation have been important targets of natural gas exploration in the Sichuan Basin for decades. However, more and more exploration and research indicate that the formation of the reservoir might be related to karstification. To testify this hypothesis, we conduct comprehensive outcrop, core, and logging...
Article
Full-text available
The development of vulnerability maps is considered to be the first step in promoting awareness, development of protection strategies and sustainable use of karst aquifers. Nevertheless, high subjectivity of current methodologies for groundwater vulnerability assessment leads to contradictory results when different models are applied over the same...

Citations

... Uhan et al. [148], assessed NO 3 − groundwater vulnerability for an alluvial aquifer combining the output of three different numerical models: (i) groundwater recharge (GROWA), (ii) NO 3 − leached from the soil profile (SWAT), and (iii) groundwater flow velocities (FEFLOW). Cui et al. [149] assessed the whole Florida shallow aquifer vulnerability through the Nr removal and transport rate in the unsaturated zone. Hansen et al. [150] developed the site-specific concept for aquifer nitrate vulnerability assessment (SCANVA) through the combination of a 3D geological reconstruction, a groundwater simulation based on MODFLOW-2000, and a complete hydro-geochemical assessment. ...
Article
Full-text available
Several groundwater vulnerability methodologies have been implemented throughout the years to face the increasing worldwide groundwater pollution, ranging from simple rating methodologies to complex numerical, statistical, and hybrid methods. Most of these methods have been used to evaluate groundwater vulnerability to nitrate, which is considered the major groundwater contaminant worldwide. Together with dilution, the degradation of nitrate via denitrification has been acknowledged as a process that can reduce reactive nitrogen mass loading rates in both deep and shallow aquifers. Thus, denitrification should be included in groundwater vulnerability studies and integrated into the various methodologies. This work reviewed the way in which denitrification has been considered within the vulnerability assessment methods and how it could increase the reliability of the overall results. Rating and statistical methods often disregard or indirectly incorporate denitrification, while numerical models make use of kinetic reactions that are able to quantify the spatial and temporal variations of denitrification rates. Nevertheless, the rating methods are still the most utilized, due to their linear structures, especially in watershed studies. More efforts should be paid in future studies to implement, calibrate, and validate user-friendly vulnerability assessment methods that are able to deal with denitrification capacity and rates at large spatial and temporal scales.
... Uhan et al. [148], assessed NO 3 − groundwater vulnerability for an alluvial aquifer combining the output of three different numerical models: (i) groundwater recharge (GROWA), (ii) NO 3 − leached from the soil profile (SWAT), and (iii) groundwater flow velocities (FEFLOW). Cui et al. [149] assessed the whole Florida shallow aquifer vulnerability through the Nr removal and transport rate in the unsaturated zone. Hansen et al. [150] developed the site-specific concept for aquifer nitrate vulnerability assessment (SCANVA) through the combination of a 3D geological reconstruction, a groundwater simulation based on MODFLOW-2000, and a complete hydro-geochemical assessment. ...
Article
Full-text available
Several groundwater vulnerability methodologies have been implemented throughout the years to face the increasing worldwide groundwater pollution, ranging from simple rating methodologies to complex numerical, statistical, and hybrid methods. Most of these methods have been used to evaluate groundwater vulnerability to nitrate, which is considered the major groundwater contaminant worldwide. Together with dilution, the degradation of nitrate via denitrification has been acknowledged as a process that can reduce reactive nitrogen mass loading rates in both deep and shallow aquifers. Thus, denitrification should be included in groundwater vulnerability studies and integrated into the various methodologies. This work reviewed the way in which denitrification has been considered within the vulnerability assessment methods and how it could increase the reliability of the overall results. Rating and statistical methods often disregard or indirectly incorporate denitrification, while numerical models make use of kinetic reactions that are able to quantify the spatial and temporal variations of denitrification rates. Nevertheless, the rating methods are still the most utilized, due to their linear structures, especially in watershed studies. More efforts should be paid in future studies to implement, calibrate, and validate user-friendly vulnerability assessment methods that are able to deal with denitrification capacity and rates at large spatial and temporal scales.
... This section is a synthesis of a series of previously non-published and published work. GIS technology has been applied to compile, integrate, analyze and visualize natural resource data in 2-D or 3-D domains through three case studies: (i) a geospatial infrastructure in support of oil shale and water resource assessment in the Piceance Basin, northwestern Colorado, United States; (ii) Seismicinduced Landslide Hazard Zonation at Nueva San Salvador, El Salvador; and (iii) Assessment of the Vulnerability of the Surficial Aquifer System for the State of Florida, United States (Luo et al., 2004(Luo et al., , 2009Luo and Zhou, 2005;Zhou et al., 2007Zhou et al., , 2015Zhou et al., , 2018Zhou et al., 2012;Zhou, 2009;Anderson et al., 2014Anderson et al., , 2017Cui et al., 2016). ...
... One of the most common applications of GIS and remote sensing techniques by the Author's research group is in Environmental Investigation (e.g., Cui et al., 2016;Semmens et al., 2017;Semmens and Zhou, 2019;Wnuk et al., 2019;Idowu and Zhou, 2019). Table 1 The landslide susceptibility zones, evaluation parameters, and ranges for each landslide susceptibility zone. ...
... Discharge from OWTS may contaminate surface water bodies and the SAS through percolation and subsurface transport of nitrogen. The SAS vulnerability study is warranted due to the harmful impact from excess nitrogen (Cui et al., 2016). ...
Chapter
Geographic Information Systems (GIS) supports data collection, geospatial data analysis, visualization, scientific communication and research collaboration. GIS has implications for many fields of the Earth Sciences, which are above and beyond one's imagination. Since the development of the first computerized GIS in the 1960s, the need by professionals for geospatial technology in fields that utilize geospatial data has never stopped expanding. As noted by a market analysis in August 2017: “The GIS Market was valued at USD 5.33 Billion in 2016 and is expected to reach USD 10.12 Billion by 2023, growing at a compound annual growth rate of 9.6% between 2017 and 2023” (marketsandmarkets.com, August 2017). Earth Sciences encompasses a broad and diverse array of technical areas, such as geology, geomorphology, geography, geophysics, hydrology, hydrogeology, environmental sciences, oceanography, meteorology, and atmospheric sciences. All of these fields use geospatial data to solve complex problems related to the planet Earth. Some of these problems are near impossible to solve without the use of GIS. This article presents a brief introduction to GIS and examples of its applications to the Earth sciences. Three case studies highlight the utility of GIS applications in compiling, integrating, analyzing and visualizing geospatial data.
... Previously, Colnar and Landis (2007) developed a regional risk assessment for the European green crab, Carcinus maenas, at Cherry Point, Washington, USA using Jenks Natural Breaks, and Schleier III and Sing (2008) used it to partition an overall risk score for the introduction of Gabusia affinis (western mosquitofish) into Montana watersheds. Beyond invasive species modeling, Jenks Natural Breaks have been used to classify groundwater into zones of vulnerability for nitrogen contamination in Florida's aquifers (Cui et al. 2016), to rank the susceptibility of locations to terrorist actions (Patterson and Apostolakis 2007), and to assess the risk of flooding in the Bengawan Solo River basin in Indonesia (Rahadianto et al. 2015). ...
Article
Full-text available
The eastern gray squirrel, Sciurus carolinensis (EGS) has been introduced to California and has expanded its geographic range since initial introductions. In this study we projected the potential future geographic range of the EGS in California using Maxent to create an ecological niche model. Location data were obtained over the time period of 2004–2015 from museum specimens, wildlife rehabilitation centers, the California Department of Public Health, the California Roadkill Observation System, and non-iNaturalist citizen science observations. Research grade data from iNaturalist was obtained over the time period of 2004–2018. Range and habitat suitability maps were developed by mapping in ArcGIS. Three threshold selection methods were used to create different estimates of the potential future range of the EGS in California. The first method used the 10th percentile logistic threshold, the second used the minimum training presence logistic threshold, and the third used Jenks Natural Breaks. We propose that Jenks Natural Breaks has distinct advantages over the other two methods for estimating the potential future range of the introduced EGS in California, because it provides information on the habitat suitability ranking throughout California, whereas the other methods only provide a binary suitable/unsuitable map.
... Aspinall and Pearson, 2000;Di Luzio et al., 2004), as well as water resource assessment in both quality and quantity (e.g. Cui et al., 2016;Zhou et al., 2015). Additionally, Wilson et al. (2000) examined the advancement of water resource assessment and management by integrating GIS and hydrological simulation model. ...
... Groundwater contamination from OWTS may reach the SAS and surface water bodies via percolation and subsurface transport of nitrogen. The detrimental impact of excess nitrogen in the environment warrants vulnerability studies that allow the delineation of areas more or less susceptible to contamination from land use practices (Cui et al., 2016). ...
... In the following sections, the study of GIS application in assessment of the vulnerability of SAS for the State of Florida is presented. This is a synthesis of previously published or nonpublished works by a research group at the Colorado School of Mines (Cui, 2014;Cui et al., 2016). The presentation of this project starts with data collection, followed by methods, input parameters, GIS implementation of the models, results, and ends with summary. ...
Chapter
Natural resources embrace a broad array of categories, including agricultural, conservational, forestry, oceanic, water, energy, and mineral resources. This article only focuses on the last three. Traditional methods for natural resource management include, but are not limited to, geophysical exploration, field geological mapping, geochemical analysis, and aero-photo interpretations. Natural resource-related research is by nature a spatial problem. Integration of field survey data and other pertinent information can be a time-consuming task by traditional ways. With the help of GIS, most of the tasks can be conducted in ways that are nearly impossible in traditional methods. Three case studies of GIS application in natural resource analyses are presented in this article to demonstrate the GIS applications in compiling, integrating, analyzing, and visualizing natural resource data.
Chapter
This chapter discusses groundwater contamination from reactive nitrogen focusing on three main areas: the United States, Europe, and China. It presents interchange of reactive nitrogen between groundwater and surface water, impacts from storage and legacy reactive nitrogen, nitrogen contamination of drinking water, and modeling vulnerability of aquifers to nitrate contamination and nitrogen fate and transport in various groundwater systems. The chapter also discusses some of the applications of different types of numerical models that have been used to investigate the transport and fate of nitrate and reactive forms of nitrogen in groundwater systems. A better understanding of the factors governing the vulnerability of groundwater to nitrate contamination is critical for developing effective policy and management strategies to reduce nitrogen input loads, protect groundwater as a safe drinking‐water source.
Article
Aquifer vulnerability index methods are commonly used for assessing groundwater vulnerability to surface contaminants. However, the methods have primarily been developed for dissolved contaminants. Microbial contaminants have unique characteristics that result in different transport behavior in the subsurface, and thus require different tools. Key vulnerability factors specific to microbial sources and subsurface transport mechanisms were identified in this study and incorporated into a model using a Geographic Information System framework to create maps of groundwater vulnerability, specific to Escherichia coli, in Alberta for the year 2012. Soil texture, soil organic matter, depth to aquifer, and meteorological conditions were assessed and combined to produce an intrinsic vulnerability map, demonstrating where aquifers were more vulnerable to bacterial contamination. Maps were created for the growing season and cold season, and attempts were made to test the model with E. coli detection data. Statistical analyses revealed the model was not suitable for predictive purposes, which may represent instances where a contamination source was absent, as opposed to real differences in aquifer vulnerability. The results will help decision makers understand which factors should be considered when making a vulnerability map for bacterial contaminants, most notably temporal factors such as precipitation and soil moisture.