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Demographic characteristics of the 3670 children enrolled in the study.

Demographic characteristics of the 3670 children enrolled in the study.

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Parents’ education and household wealth cannot be presumed to operate independently of each other. However, in traditional studies on the impact of social inequality on obesity, education and financial wealth tend to be viewed as separable processes. The present study examines the interaction of parents’ education and household wealth in relation t...

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Context 1
... coverage attained by the anthropometric examination was 3670 (95% of the total number of enrolled students from selected grades 4, 5, and 6 of the 26 schools). As shown in Table 3, the average age of children in the present study was 10.8 ± 1.0 years. Forty-nine percent of the children were girls and 44.8% of the children were from urban families. ...
Context 2
... overall prevalence of obesity was 17.0%, defined by BMI, and the overall prevalence of abdominal obesity was 8.1%, defined by WHR. Table 3 also shows distribution of parents' education in each household wealth quintile. As shown in Table 4, boys had a statistically higher obesity prevalence compared to girls (p < 0.001). ...
Context 3
... interaction effect was found between household wealth and mother's education. Table S1: Interaction between parent education and household wealth categories on obesity and abdominal obesity risk, Table S2: Interaction between parent education and household wealth categories on obesity and abdominal obesity risk separated by sex, Table S3: Interaction between parent education and household wealth categories on obesity and abdominal obesity risk separated by residence area, Figure S1: OR (95%CI) for parent education level at different values of the household wealth categories among girls, Figure S2: OR (95%CI) for parent education level at different values of the household wealth categories among urban residences. ...

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... Household wealth. The procedure to generate the household wealth index had been previously described in detail [21]. The index was generated through a principal components analysis based on the following indicators: household income, food costs as a proportion of annual income, ratio of income to expenditure, self-reported evaluation of household income compared to the local average, income growth in the last three years, satisfaction of household income, number of private cars, number of computers, if the child has his/her own room, and number of family trips per year. ...
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... Sociodemographic data comprises questions about the household environmental and parental educational level (Liu et al., 2018). The eating habits section contains questions concerning food attitudes and behaviours, such as meal regularity and snacking habits, within or outside school (Magklis et al., 2019). ...
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... In addition, family background also played a significant role in shaping children's body mass. The current literature suggests that children who grow up in more affluent families have a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity [17], and children with siblings are less likely to be overweight and obese than children in one-child families [10]. In addition, children's risks of overweight and obesity are positively associated with parental education and BMI [10,17]. ...
... The current literature suggests that children who grow up in more affluent families have a higher prevalence of overweight and obesity [17], and children with siblings are less likely to be overweight and obese than children in one-child families [10]. In addition, children's risks of overweight and obesity are positively associated with parental education and BMI [10,17]. ...
... In addition, parents' education attainment had a significant impact on children's growth. Well-educated parents may have better nutrition knowledge and care more about children's growth, and they have higher motivation to adopt a healthy lifestyle as role models for their children [17]. It should be noted that a father's and mother's education may have different impacts on children's growth status. ...