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Decoder design principles
Detailed (colors; see Fig. 1) and abstracted (black) topologies of four simple functional circuits (top; numbers indicate topology variants). Internal dynamics of TF1 and TF2 were simulated for a random viable parameter sample for each circuit, with different input (α-factor) durations (indicated by colors; bottom).

Decoder design principles Detailed (colors; see Fig. 1) and abstracted (black) topologies of four simple functional circuits (top; numbers indicate topology variants). Internal dynamics of TF1 and TF2 were simulated for a random viable parameter sample for each circuit, with different input (α-factor) durations (indicated by colors; bottom).

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Cells can encode information about their environment by modulating signaling dynamics and responding accordingly. Yet, the mechanisms cells use to decode these dynamics remain unknown when cells respond exclusively to transient signals. Here, we approach design principles underlying such decoding by rationally engineering a synthetic short-pulse de...

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... Correlation between the pulses of NF-jB and differential gene expression patterns have been identified in the recent past (Lane et al., 2017;Zambrano et al., 2016). Subsequently, mathematical model studies revealed the topology of network motifs that are capable of generating pulses (Gao et al., 2018;Lormeau et al., 2021;Martinez-Corral et al., 2018;Zhang et al., 2016). Therefore, it is important to gain a systematic quantitative understanding of how various network motifs process pulsatile signals such that regulatory units process it as a true signal leaving out the small amplitude noisy signals. ...
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