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DPPH scavenging activity of solvent extracts of Luffa cylindrica leaf % Inhibition

DPPH scavenging activity of solvent extracts of Luffa cylindrica leaf % Inhibition

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Free radical and reactive oxygen species scavenging potentials of four solvent extracts of Luffa cylindrica leaf was evaluated in vitro. Leaves of L. cylindrica were extracted with distilled water (aqueous), methanol, ethylacetate, and hexane. The aqueous, methanolic and hexane extracts effectively scavenged 1, 1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) in...

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... DPPH scavenging activities of ascorbic acid used as the reference antioxidant compound and the extracts (aqueous, methanolic and ethylacetate) were dose dependent with the aqueous, methanolic and hexane extracts exhibiting higher DPPH scavenging activity than ascorbic acid. The result showed that the hexane extract of L. cylindtica leaf exhibited the strongest inhibitory activity against DPPH at all concentrations (10, 20, 30, 40 and 50 mg/ml) while the ethylacetate extract showed the least inhibitory activity against DPPH radical at these concentrations (Table 2). ...

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Background: Malaria is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa, and oxidative stress has been implicated in malaria disease. Luffa cylindrica is an ethnomedicinal plant used to treat various diseases, including malaria. The oxidative stress-reducing potential of L. cylindrica in malaria-disease state of Plasmodium berghei NK-65 parasite-infected mice was carried out in vivo. Methods: Mice were infected with P. berghei NK-65, and the effect of administration of methanolic leaves extract (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg b.w) of L. cylindrica on percentage parasitemia in blood smear, antioxidant enzymes (catalase CAT, superoxide dismutase SOD, glutathione-s-transferase GST), non-enzymatic antioxidant (reduced glutathione GSH) and malondialdehyde concentration in tissues (plasma, liver, kidneys, and spleen) of mice was investigated and compared to chloroquine and artesunate as reference antimalarial drugs. Phytochemical constituents of the extract were determined by standard methods. Results: Saponins, tannins, terpenes, phenolics, flavonoids, alkaloids, and glycosides were the phytochemical constituents identified in the extract. The extract at three doses (100, 200, and 400 mg/kg b.w.) investigated caused a significant reduction (p < 0.05) of parasite growth with over 90% reduction in parasitemia level in mice infected with the parasite. The extract also ameliorated oxidative stress in mice by significantly (p < 0.05) increasing the activities of CAT, SOD, and GST in the studied tissues of mice. The level of malondialdehyde, a marker of oxidative stress in mice, was also significantly (p < 0.05) reduced by the extract. The results were comparable with chloroquine- and artesunate-treated groups. Conclusion: The study concludes that L. cylindrica is an effective therapy for treating malaria and for the management of its oxidative stress-related complications due to its antioxidant properties.
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Introduction: Luffa cylindrica is a plant used in folk medicine of Nigeria to treat malaria. Safety evaluation of methanolic leaves extract of Luffa cylindrica was carried out in selected organs of mice at the doses of 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg body weight (b.w). Methodology: Thirty albino mice were completely randomized into six groups consisting of five mice each. Animals in group A served as the control and received 0.2 ml of distilled water while groups B, C, D, E and F received the same volume (0.2 ml) of 50, 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg b.w. methanolic leaves extract of L. cylindrica respectively for 7 days orally. The activity of aspartate, alanine and gamma glutamyl aminotransferases (AST, ALT, GGT), alkaline phosphatase (ALT) as well as histological study in selected organs (spleen, liver and kidney) of mice was assessed. Serum albumin, total and conjugated bilirubin, total protein, urea and creatinine concentrations were also evaluated. Results: The extract significantly (p < 0.05) reduced the activities of ALT, AST and ALP in the selected organs and significantly (p < 0.05) increased their activities in the serum at all doses investigated. GGT activity increased significantly in the serum and decreased significantly in the liver and spleen at 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg b.w. A significant increase (p < 0.05) was observed in urea, total and conjugated bilirubin concentrations while there was no significant alteration observed in the serum albumin, creatinine and total protein concentrations of animals at all the doses compared to the control. Histological changes with evidence of multinucleated giant cells and periportal lymphocytic inflammation occurred in the spleen and liver respectively at 100, 200, 400 and 800 mg/kg b.w. Conclusion: The results suggest that consumption of L. cylindrica leaf extract may have deleterious effect on the kidney, spleen and liver.