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DJI FC220 UAV camera sensor specifications.

DJI FC220 UAV camera sensor specifications.

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Autonomous surface vehicles (ASVs) are becoming more and more popular for performing hydrographic and navigational tasks. One of the key aspects of autonomous navigation is the need to avoid collisions with other objects, including shore structures. During a mission, an ASV should be able to automatically detect obstacles and perform suitable maneu...

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... MAV was equipped with a DJI FC220 non-metric camera with sensor size 1/2.3" (6.16mm × 4.55 mm) and pixel size 1.55 µm (Table 5). The camera tagged (into the EXIF metadata) the images with geolocation data using the MAV's GPS (direct image georeferencing). ...

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... Ship identification means vessel detecting, recognising and matching the existing data on units capable of navigating specified areas. There are several ways to identify a vessel, depending on specific needs: dedicated Automatic Identification System (AIS) transponders [1], radar systems [2] for tracking and tracing, Long-Range Identification and Tracking (LRIT) that uses voice communication to confirm identity [3], etc. However, visual confirmation is vital in many cases, and onshore video surveillance systems play that part. ...
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... Theoretically, and in line with previous experience [18,19,79], the calibration parameters for a single camera should be the same or very similar. Typically, especially for non-metric cameras, the recovered IOP are only valid for that particular project, and they can be slightly different for another image block under different conditions. ...
... The graphical presentation of grouped results with corresponding error, for day/night cases, shows a noticeable trend and relationships that translate to the above reduced image quality. Theoretically, and in line with previous experience [18,19,79], the calibration parameters for a single camera should be the same or very similar. Typically, especially for nonmetric cameras, the recovered IOP are only valid for that particular project, and they can be slightly different for another image block under different conditions. ...
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