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Cyrtorchis submontana Stévart, Droissart & Azandi sp. nov. A. Habit. B. Inflorescence. C. Flower. D. Ovary, section. E. Dorsal sepal. F. Lateral petal. G. Lateral sepal. H. Labellum with spur, frontal. I. Labellum with spur, side view. J. Column with part of opened spur. K. Column, side view. L. Column, frontal. M. Column, side view. N. Anther cap, above. O. Anther cap, frontal. P. Anther cap, from below. Q. Stipe with pollinia. R. Stipe, frontal. S. Stipe, side view. Stévart & Ndong Bokung 273 (A, B, D, K, M, Q, R, S) Droissart 112 (C, E, F, G, H, I, N, O, P) Stévart 1593 (J, L) (Drawing by Hans de Vries, 6 November 2015).  

Cyrtorchis submontana Stévart, Droissart & Azandi sp. nov. A. Habit. B. Inflorescence. C. Flower. D. Ovary, section. E. Dorsal sepal. F. Lateral petal. G. Lateral sepal. H. Labellum with spur, frontal. I. Labellum with spur, side view. J. Column with part of opened spur. K. Column, side view. L. Column, frontal. M. Column, side view. N. Anther cap, above. O. Anther cap, frontal. P. Anther cap, from below. Q. Stipe with pollinia. R. Stipe, frontal. S. Stipe, side view. Stévart & Ndong Bokung 273 (A, B, D, K, M, Q, R, S) Droissart 112 (C, E, F, G, H, I, N, O, P) Stévart 1593 (J, L) (Drawing by Hans de Vries, 6 November 2015).  

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... guillaumetii Pérez-Vera by Droissart et al. (2009). Actually, all of them belong to C. submontana Stévart, Droissart & Azandi (Azandi et al. 2016), also in agreement with our revision of different materials from this country. We reject the occurrence of C. brownii in this territory, although the taxon could be found according to its distribution range (Azandi et al. 2016). ...
... Actually, all of them belong to C. submontana Stévart, Droissart & Azandi (Azandi et al. 2016), also in agreement with our revision of different materials from this country. We reject the occurrence of C. brownii in this territory, although the taxon could be found according to its distribution range (Azandi et al. 2016). ...
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