Current workflow diagram from simulation to physics analysis. The oval steps represent an action, while the boxes represent data files of a given format. The final box is the reconstructed data in analysis format

Current workflow diagram from simulation to physics analysis. The oval steps represent an action, while the boxes represent data files of a given format. The final box is the reconstructed data in analysis format

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The accurate simulation of additional interactions at the ATLAS experiment for the analysis of proton–proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider presents a significant challenge to the computing resources. During the LHC Run 2 (2015–2018), there were up to 70 inelastic interactions per bunch crossing, which need to be accounted for in...

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The accurate simulation of additional interactions at the ATLAS experiment for the analysis of proton–proton collisions delivered by the Large Hadron Collider presents a significant challenge to the computing resources. During the LHC Run 2 (2015–2018), there were up to 70 inelastic interactions per bunch crossing, which need to be accounted for in...

Citations

... Traditionally each in-time or out-of-time interaction is sampled individually and taken into account at the digitisation step, when detector digital responses are emulated. Experiments pre-sample pile-up events and reuse them between different samples to reduce computational time [55,56]. While the presampling itself still has the same CPU limitations, using those pileup events barely depends on the amount of pileup (red circles in Figure 1), but could cause larger stress on storage. ...
... The CPU time is normalized to the time taken for the standard pileup for the lowest μ bin. Taken from Ref.[55]. ...
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