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Current COVID-19 status of Malaria endemic and non-endemic countries

Current COVID-19 status of Malaria endemic and non-endemic countries

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COVID-19 (coronavirus disease 2019) is a disease caused by the coronavirus SARS-CoV-2 (severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2). COVID19 has yielded many reported complications and unusual observations. In this article, we have reviewed one such observation: an association between malaria endemicity and reduced reported COVID-19 fatality. M...

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... correlations have been discussed in the study done by Napoli et al. 13 . Table 1 shows a comparison of the current data on COVID distribution and fatality rate of the top 20 most affected countries by COVID-19, based on data from WHO's COVID-19 case reports. Countries have been labelled as malaria endemic or nonendemic, on the basis of WHO's malaria reports. ...

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The entire globe is grave consequences of the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic caused by the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronaviruses 2 (SARS-CoV-2). Many drugs have been repurposed and recorded effectiveness in the treatment of COVID-19. However, the FDA-approved drugs are still not available against COVID-19. In addition, the v...

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... However, there are several other factors that may have contributed to this reduction, such as symptomatic individuals being hesitant to visit health facilities due to fear of catching COVID-19 or stigma associated with being diagnosed with COVID-19, which suggests that COVID-19 infected individuals may not be seeking medical assessment [125,127]. Various studies have also described that reported COVID-19 fatality rate is significantly lower in malaria endemic than non-malaria endemic regions which may be attributed to a number of factors including lower capacity for testing, a lower mean population age or possibly cross-immunity or shared immunodominant epitopes between P. falciparum and COVID-19 [128,129]. ...
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