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Cross-section of ships showing ballast tanks and ballast water cycle. (Adapted from GloBallast 2016).

Cross-section of ships showing ballast tanks and ballast water cycle. (Adapted from GloBallast 2016).

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Shipping plays a crucial role in supporting global trade, including the transport of products from the aquaculture industry. However, ships may also unintentionally transport invasive species and pathogens in their ballast water which pose biosecurity risks for aquaculture. The Ballast Water Management Convention was developed to manage the biosecu...

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... ports to avoid travelling empty, there is often a need to balance cargoes in weight. Other ship types such as container vessels may adapt their ballasting regime to the amount and type of cargo in each port visited through a route across the globe. Ballast water is used in ships as a means to stabilize the ship when no or limited cargo is present (Fig. 1). It is an important aspect of the routine activities on-board and ensures that the ship and the crew are safe. Because of this vital role, ships will to continue to use ballast water for many more decades, if not forever. Because of the consequences of bio-invasions generated by the exchange of ballast water across ecosystems, this ...

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... A risk assessment methodology must be developed to protect the marine environment effectively from HAOP transferred by ballast water. Ships engaged on shortsea voyages between specific ports or locations ("same location") may be granted an exemption from installing BWMS under the BWMC (regulation A-4) if it is assessed that the risk of HAOP transfer is relatively minor [48]. Although this approach is beneficial for liner ship shipowners in specific areas, regional administrations should bear in mind the results of [20] and carefully assess the risks before granting any exceptions. ...
... A risk assessment methodology must be developed to protect the marine environment effectively from HAOP transferred by ballast water. Ships engaged on short-sea voyages between specific ports or locations ("same location") may be granted an exemption from installing BWMS under the BWMC (regulation A-4) if it is assessed that the risk of HAOP transfer is relatively minor [48]. Although this approach is beneficial for liner ship shipowners in specific areas, regional administrations should bear in mind the results of [20] and carefully assess the risks before granting any exceptions. ...
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