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Cosmic-ray all-electron spectrum measured by CALET from 10 GeV to 3 TeV, where systematic errors (not including the uncertainty on the energy scale) are drawn as a gray band. The measured all-electron flux including statistical and systematic errors is tabulated in Ref. [6]. Also plotted are measurements in space [35-37] and from ground-based experiments [38,39]. 

Cosmic-ray all-electron spectrum measured by CALET from 10 GeV to 3 TeV, where systematic errors (not including the uncertainty on the energy scale) are drawn as a gray band. The measured all-electron flux including statistical and systematic errors is tabulated in Ref. [6]. Also plotted are measurements in space [35-37] and from ground-based experiments [38,39]. 

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First results of a cosmic-ray electron and positron spectrum from 10 GeV to 3 TeV is presented based upon observations with the CALET instrument on the International Space Station starting in October, 2015. Nearly a half million electron and positron events are included in the analysis. CALET is an all-calorimetric instrument with total vertical th...

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