Figure 6 - uploaded by Qinghan Bian
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Correlations between land surface temperature changes (anomalies) and the energy entered the land surface layer. Blue dots and the blue solid line show the relation between temperature changes calculated by Equation (3) and the energy entered the land surface with a correlation coefficient of 1; Orange squares and the orange dash line represent NASA_Land_Annual_mean [33]; Black triangles and the black solid line represent the 5-year NASA_Land_Lowess smoothing of observations [33], respectively. Left: during the period of 1965-2019; Right: during the period of 1980-2019.

Correlations between land surface temperature changes (anomalies) and the energy entered the land surface layer. Blue dots and the blue solid line show the relation between temperature changes calculated by Equation (3) and the energy entered the land surface with a correlation coefficient of 1; Orange squares and the orange dash line represent NASA_Land_Annual_mean [33]; Black triangles and the black solid line represent the 5-year NASA_Land_Lowess smoothing of observations [33], respectively. Left: during the period of 1965-2019; Right: during the period of 1980-2019.

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Context 1
... the simulation results at the boundary layer depth of 0.025 meters, observed anomalies (NASA_Land_Annual_mean and NASA_Land_Lowess) against the energy entered the land surface are shown in Figure 6: Left-the data from 1965from -2019from and Right-the data from 1980from -2019 clearly that strong relationships exist either for the NASA_Land_Annual_mean vs the energy or the NASA_Land_Lowess vs the energy, and both have big correlation coefficients, while the simulation's correlation coefficient is 1. ...
Context 2
... after excluding the data before 1980, the observational trends (NASA_Land_Annual_mean and NASA_Land_Lowess) in the right figure of Figure 6 are much closer to the simulations than shown in the left. All these indicate that strong relationship exists between the land surface temperature change and the energy absorbed. ...
Context 3
... discussed above, large amount of waste heat has been cumulated towards the polar areas, especially the North because of the densified population, increased fossil fuel consumption and thus increased associated waste heat release, via the atmospheric vortexes. Figure 16 shows the waste heat energy distribution in the climate system where the steps indicate the change of salinity in sea ices. Among the total energy that entered the climate system, about 92.8% -96.8% entered the oceans through melting sea ices and glaciers, warming surface seawaters (this aligns well with the estimate by Luann D. and Rebecca L. [36], and Figure 14 above), 1.9% -4.3% absorbed by air, with the remainder (about 1.3% -2.9%) absorbed by the land. ...
Context 4
... the energy (mainly non-renewable energy) consumption, energy effective conversion efficiency and the salinity in sea ices are known, it is possible to Figure 16. Waste heat energy distribution in the climate system. ...
Context 5
... forecast values of the climate change indicators (temperature risings of surface air, land surface, sea surface and sea level rise) are shown in Table 7. The forecast for temperature changes is performed by the two aforesaid methods: theoretical methods with Equations (2)-(4); Regression equations of simulated results and regression equations of measurements in Fig- ure 4, Figure 6, Figure 8 and Figure 11, respectively. With the endeavors and measures to be taken, the climate change indicators are remarkably suppressed under the forecast energy consumption scenarios compared to the current levels. ...

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