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Context 1
... contexts, discussed in more detail below, also play a role in developing 'the resilient teacher' as shown in Figure 3. ...

Citations

... 2, Susan Beltman discusses the various ways resilience has been conceptualised in the literature, emphasising the advantages afforded by multiple perspectives. Starting with our early work (Beltman et al. 2011;Mansfield et al. 2012b) which began with exploration of personal risks and resources (Mansfield et al. 2012a), moving to investigating the teacher resilience process (Mansfield et al. 2014) and then context and system perspectives (Mansfield et al. 2016b(Mansfield et al. , c, 2018, this chapter illustrates how the multiple perspectives enable unique insights and move the field forward. ...
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This volume brings together a programme of research focused on teacher resilience and includes chapters from conceptual, empirical and applied perspectives. The inspiration for this volume stems from two Australian projects: Building Resilience in Teacher Education (BRiTE) and the subsequent Australian Learning and Teaching Fellowship, Staying BRiTE: Promoting Resilience in Higher Education. The chapters follow the journey of interrelated research that has grown across Australia and internationally, highlighting a range of approaches, applications and impact. Each chapter draws on particular aspects of teacher resilience and emphasises the importance of context in cultivating resilience at a range of teacher career stages. Future directions broadening the programme of research are also explored.
... Our early work in the field (Mansfield et al. 2012b) highlighted the need for specific resources to support teacher resilience and in response we developed five online learning modules, known as the BRiTE (Building Resilience in Teacher Education) modules (Mansfield et al. 2016a). This chapter overviews the journey of developing the BRiTE modules and how this body of work has developed since. ...
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Resilience is widely acknowledged as important for teacher success, yet how to assist pre-service teachers build the skills and strategies for professional resilience is a question often asked by teacher educators. This chapter overviews the design, development and features of a series of five online learning modules designed to support pre-service teacher resilience. The BRiTE modules were informed by an analysis of the literature and content created to address the key themes. Five modules were developed: Building resilience, Relationships, Wellbeing, Taking initiative and Emotions. Each module was designed to be interactive and personalised, enabling users to build their personal toolkit to support their resilience. Since their launch in 2015, the modules have been widely used by pre-service teachers, teachers and a range of stakeholders with over 14,000 registered users at the beginning of 2020. Potential for future use in supporting teacher resilience is discussed.
... Kenneth Ginsburg's ( 2011 ) 7 Cs-control, competence, coping, confidence, connection, character, contribution;Genie Joseph's ( 2017 ) 3 types of resilience-natural, adaptive, restored: and Mansfield et al.'s ( 2012 ) dimensions of protective factors-professional, emotional, social and motivational. These typologies position resilience within an environmental context impacted by internal and external factors. ...
... Many studies have examined the importance of teacher-student relationships and resilience (Spilt et al. 2011 ), explored the impact on resilience on the teacher profession (Hong 2012 ) and exposed the protective factors that affect the resilience levels in teachers (e.g. Froehlich-Gildhoff and Roennau-Boese 2012 ; Mansfield et al. 2012 ). Limited studies have explored ways that teacher resilience can be promoted through professional learning experience (Mansfield and Beltman 2019 ). ...
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Initial teacher education predominately spends time preparing student teachers to plan, teach and assess the cognitive and social development of children within the classroom. Yet, the role of a teacher expands well beyond classroom experiences and at times includes conflict and stressful situations. How do ITE programs cater for these critical learning incidences? Augmented realities such as ‘human in the loop’ simulation and virtual learning environments provide current ITE programs a solution to this contemporary need and context. This paper is underpinned conceptually by Pedagogies of Practice: representation, decomposition and approximations actualised through new technologies, reflective practice strategies and challenging learning experiences. The interconnectivity between BRiTE modules (representations), Microteaching 2.0 (decomposition) and Simlab™ experiences (approximation) provides a unique approach that supports the development of resilience for our future teacher educators. The findings reveal an increased self-efficacy amongst the cohort and personal confidence in their own resilience capabilities. The reflective practice strategies embedded in the BRiTE-AR pedagogy of practices are offered as a possible solution to ITE educators interested in developing resilience in our future teachers.
... When we think of resilience and teachers, we generally think about "what sustains teachers and enables them to thrive rather than just survive in the profession" (Beltman et al. 2011). I have been fortunate to have worked with colleagues over the past ten years on a number of research projects related to teacher resilience, including Keeping Cool (Mansfield et al. 2012a), ENTREE (Wosnitza et al. 2013) and BRiTE (Mansfield et al. 2015) (see Chap. 3). In our work, we have adopted different lenses to ask different kinds of research questions and used the findings from others' research using different perspectives to guide our thinking and interventions. ...
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In this chapter, I argue that differing conceptualisations of the construct of resilience shape and enrich the research questions and methodology used to examine it. In addition, the conceptual focus has implications for questions such as whose responsibility it is for the development of resilience. Research conducted within two Australian projects, Keeping Cool and BRiTE (Building Resilience in Teacher Education) is used as an illustration of the impact of a changing conceptual focus. For example, beginning with a psychological perspective led to an examination of risk and protective factors for individuals. More contextual approaches involved a comparison of countries. Recent systemic views support a model that encompasses both personal and contextual characteristics, as well as strategies used and outcomes achieved. It is argued that taking multiple perspectives in this programme of work has enabled the incorporation of a broad range of research methods and findings, and contributed to a deeper understanding of the construct of teacher resilience.
... The motivational dimension comprises aspects like perseverance, self-con dence and optimism. The social dimension refers to the ability to seek and accept advice and to form support networks (Mans eld et al. 2012b). According to Mans eld et al. (2012b), a resilient teacher has characteristics belonging to all four dimensions. ...
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This chapter focuses on the interplay of motivation to teach and resilience of pre-service teachers. A questionnaire study with two samples is presented: a group of students at the beginning of their teacher education programme (n = 293) and a group of trainee teachers (n = 126) in the transition between university and school. Both samples completed a questionnaire including the Teacher Resilience Questionnaire by Mansfield (Teacher resilience questionnaire. Murdoch University, Perth, 2013) and the Motivational Orientations to Teach Survey by Sinclair (Asia-Pac J Teach Educ 36:79–104, 2008a). Besides a significant correlation between resilience and the intrinsic motivation to teach, it became apparent both students and trainee teachers were distinctly driven more by intrinsic motives regarding the motivation to teach than by extrinsic motives. Whilst resilience was altogether equally pronounced in both groups, significant differences were apparent regarding the emotional dimension of resilience and regarding the kind of the motivation to teach. The fact that trainee teachers show significantly lower values regarding the emotional dimension of resilience and the intrinsic and extrinsic motivation could be the result of a “reality check” caused by first teaching experiences.
... This research agenda reflects broader research concentration and professional action across Australia into how to enhance rural education (Reid et al. 2010; White, Kline, Hastings & Lock 2011). This project draws on findings from several significant Australian studies exploring the interconnected focus areas of teacher resilience and rural and remote teaching (Johnson et al. 2012; Mansfield et al. 2012; White et al. 2011). This project differs from previous studies however, as it is the first to offer internet based solutions to empowering early career teachers during their transition into the profession. ...
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This paper explores methodological turning points in researching narratives of early career resilience mediated by the complexities of remote teaching. Innovative, flexible and discursive research design facilitated exploration of emerging narratives using digital technologies. Data were regularly interrogated with participant-researchers to reveal the undercurrents of imbued meaning. Dialogue with participant-researchers enhanced interpretations of data plots and text-based explanations of narrative turning points, providing valuable insights throughout analysis. Reflections on the affordances and tensions in this process illustrate the significance of innovation but also the complexities associated with online collaboration. Consequently, empowering the participant-researchers throughout the life of the research was critical in understanding their narratives of teaching.
Chapter
Resilience, or the process of adjusting well to adversity, is a process that requires input from social ecologies. The resilience literature is unambiguous that a crucial source of such social-ecological support is teachers. However, most accounts of how teachers enable resilience are drawn from Global North studies (i.e. studies in the more developed countries of the Northern hemisphere). To address this gap, my chapter reports how high school teachers from rural, disadvantaged contexts in South Africa informed the resilience of their students. To do so, I draw on phenomenological data generated by 230 Sesotho-speaking adolescents who participated in the Pathways to Resilience Study. Using the lens of Ungar’s Social Ecology of Resilience Theory, I extrapolate teacher actions that enabled students to accommodate structural adversities. I then draw attention to resilience-supporting actions that teachers did not advance. I use both these teacher actions and apathies to theorise changes to teacher education if teachers are to champion resilience in Global South contexts.