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1 -Construction Accident Rates and Construction GDP in Hong Kong  

1 -Construction Accident Rates and Construction GDP in Hong Kong  

Source publication
Technical Report
Full-text available
The expected increase in output within the next two years with the onset of the MTR projects presents a serious dilemma. Accident rates mirror output in the construction industry and we should anticipate a significant increase in the accident rate with the increase in output. Thus, it is necessary to plan now for the expected upturn - the situation...

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