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Comparison of test-retest results, separately for each physiotherapist

Comparison of test-retest results, separately for each physiotherapist

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Background: In clinical practice there is a need for a specific scale enabling detailed and multifactorial assessment of gait in children with spastic hemiplegic cerebral palsy. The practical value of the present study is linked with the attempts to find a new, affordable, easy-to-use tool for gait assessment in children with spastic hemiplegic ce...

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... low value of standard deviation in the differences between the two exams (for the specific physiotherapists amount- ing to 0.60; 0.72 and 0.94, respectively) allows a conclu- sion that deviations between the test-retest results do not exceed a few percent in relation to the outcome value (on average amounting to approx. 19.5 points) - Table 4. Findings of comparative analysis of the test-retest re- sults are also shown in Table 5, which presents the result of Wilcoxon test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient with assessment of significance, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and value of intra-subject coefficient of variation (CV) and minimal detectable change (MDC), between the two examinations (test-retest). All the figures show very good test-retest reliability. ...
Context 2
... low value of standard deviation in the differences between the two exams (for the specific physiotherapists amount- ing to 0.60; 0.72 and 0.94, respectively) allows a conclu- sion that deviations between the test-retest results do not exceed a few percent in relation to the outcome value (on average amounting to approx. 19.5 points) - Table 4. Findings of comparative analysis of the test-retest re- sults are also shown in Table 5, which presents the result of Wilcoxon test, Spearman's rank correlation coefficient with assessment of significance, intra-class correlation coefficient (ICC), and value of intra-subject coefficient of variation (CV) and minimal detectable change (MDC), between the two examinations (test-retest). All the figures show very good test-retest reliability. ...

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... The minimum size of the sample was calculated taking into account the number of children with intellectual disability attending the special educational facility in the Podkarpackie Region, Poland, annually. A fraction size of 0.9 was used, with a maximum error of 5% [32][33][34][35], a sample size of 58 children was obtained. The study involved 60 children. ...
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