Comparison of pH levels for Commercial Lambic (Gueuze) Beers. 

Comparison of pH levels for Commercial Lambic (Gueuze) Beers. 

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Lambic beer is the oldest style of beer still being produced in the Western world using spontaneous fermentation. Gueuze is a style of lambic beer prepared by mixing young (one year) and older (two to three years) beers. Little is known about the volatiles and semi-volatiles found in commercial samples of gueuze lambic beers. SPME was used to extra...

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... pH range observed for the nine commercial beers that we examined ranged from 3.23 to 3.62 (Table 1). Hanssens Artisan and 3-Fonteine had the lowest pH values of 3.23 and 3.24, respectively. ...
Context 2
... Artisan and 3-Fonteine had the lowest pH values of 3.23 and 3.24, respectively. These samples also had the highest total acidity (Tables 1 and 3). Hanssens Artisan, which had the lowest pH, also had the highest titratable acidity (TA) at 7.83 g/L, while 3-Fonteine had the second highest TA at 5.71 g/L. ...
Context 3
... Artisan, which had the lowest pH, also had the highest titratable acidity (TA) at 7.83 g/L, while 3-Fonteine had the second highest TA at 5.71 g/L. A significant difference in pH was found between all of the beers (Table 1). ...

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