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Comparison of material stocks in three typical neighborhoods of the Paris region

Comparison of material stocks in three typical neighborhoods of the Paris region

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Better knowledge of the spatial distribution of anthropogenic stocks is key for the implementation of circular economy policies. This article focuses on the case of construction materials in the Paris region in 2013. A bottom-up approach using GIS modeling is applied to estimate and locate the stocks of 27 materials and 24 building archetypes, thre...

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Context 1
... share is more important for roads and railways representing respectively 81 and 69%. Energy and water networks stocks are 100% underground except for the electricity network (table 24 in Stock density amounts to 0.2 t/m 2 of the total regional area. The density reaches 0.9 t/m 2 , taking only urbanized areas into account. ...
Context 2
... is in an intermediate situation. Stocks by buildings and networks are detailed in Table 25 in SM. ...
Context 3
... is mostly located in Paris, low-density multi-family houses in Paris and PC, and single-family houses in PC and GC. Figure 6 illustrates the three neighborhood units. Table 2 compares the three neighborhoods in terms of urban characteristics and stocks in buildings and roads (parking and sidewalks included). Stocks in underground networks, accounting for a small portion are ignored. ...
Context 4
... length per département according to APUR (2010) and breakdown by material for each département according to coefficients from Mairie de Paris (2015). Source: authors Source: authors Source: authors Table 25. Stocks by building and network, Paris, Petite Couronne and Grande Couronne, 2013, kt ...

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... However, this also leads to the conclusion that the management of building materials and CDW should not only be considered within political boundaries, as it is done now, but must take place supra-regionally within functional boundaries (e.g., urban areas with their supplying neighboring regions) to carry out effective resource planning. This finding is supported by other studies (Augiseau and Kim, 2021;Kliem et al., 2021;Schiller et al., 2017Schiller et al., , 2020. ...
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