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, Comparison of embodied energy and carbon emission in the production of ceramic block

, Comparison of embodied energy and carbon emission in the production of ceramic block

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Conference Paper
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Building materials have different consumption patterns of energy and emissions of carbon dioxide during their production. These differences result from the treatment of the raw materials and the techniques applied to production. Subsequently on an environmental classification one wonders what kind of constructive solution becomes more benevolent to...

Context in source publication

Context 1
... values used here are average values to increase the likelihood of a fair comparison of the data. Table 1 shows that the data of CTCV are significantly lower. The reason lies in the statistical analysis of the period. ...

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Citations

... Peng, Zhao, Jiao, Zheng and Zeng [5] have calculated the CO2 emission and also suggest the options to reduce the emission in a ceramic tile manufacturer. For construction purpose, Sazedj, Morais and Jalali had compared the CO 2 emission from two types of materials, bricks and concrete block [6]. Bribian, Capilla and Uson [7] also studied the energy demand and CO 2 emission among different construction materials which are ceramic, steel, PVC, wood, mortar, cement, aluminium and lime. ...
Article
Carbon emission from the manufacturing sector is a critical issue which is concerned by the environmental authorities since the violation of the carbon emission cap might lead to the sanction by one of Thailand's largest trade partner, European Union (EU). As a result, it is important for the manufacturers to be able to assess their own products' carbon footprint. In this study, the selected case study is a ceramic factory which manufactures non-glazed floor files. The scope of evaluation covers Business-to-Customer (B2C) transaction while the life cycle of a product includes four stages, i.e., resource extraction, manufacturing, distribution, use and waste disposal. The study results indicate that the highest contribution to the carbon emission is from the extraction of ceramic clay while the manufacturing stage has the second highest effect on the emission. The distribution of products, use and disposal are the life cycle stages which have small effects on the emission. Another objective of this research is to conduct an empirical study which leads to the capability to quantify the effect of different factors on the manufacturing of floor tiles. According to the experimental study, three factors, i.e., chalk clay, ball clay and feldspar, are considered as the process inputs while the response variables are percent absorption and hardness. Elaborately, 2³ full factorial design was deployed to study the find the relationship between inputs and outputs. The results has two folds. The first fold is useful for the manufacturers who would like to understand how much their product has emitted the greenhouse gas to the atmosphere and it might lead to the minimization of their emission. Moreover, the relation between the tile characteristic and factors affecting the manufacturing is known so the manufacturer is able to efficiently optimize the manufacturing process in order to achieve the highest quality products.
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Energy use in the building is responsible for one-third of total carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions globally. Nearly half of the energy loss occurs through the building envelope due to heat transfer to/for the surroundings. Therefore, there is a need to design an optimum building envelope to reduce energy use in buildings that depend on several parameters. This study aims to review different building parameters and provide a conceptual framework to optimize the building envelope. In total, 260 papers were reviewed, and the building envelope design consideration was categorized into: 1) Design Parameters (design and geometry), 2) environmental conditions (indoor and outdoor) and 3) performance criteria (energy, environment, economic, comfort). Energy use and CO2-emission in buildings increase with high thermal conductivity, low thermal mass, and low solar absorption of its envelope. Geometrically, building orientation impacts energy use more than the building shape factor. Changing set point temperature according to surrounding conditions has reduced energy use and CO2-emission by 30% and 56%, respectively. However, indoor air quality, velocity, and occupancy have meagerly affected building energy use. Energy and emission optimization criteria are directly related, but the emission-based optimized envelope is thicker than the energy one. Other criteria such as economy and comfort (thermal and visual) are inversely proportional to the energy-efficient building envelope. Based on the comprehensive review, this study proposed a conceptual framework to design a sustainable building envelope that includes life cycle assessment, occupant's satisfaction, and social benefits. Several future research recommendations were made, including 1) the use of switchable reflective materials to minimize heat transfer, 2) dynamic insulation material to control insulation value as needed, and 3) smart windows with tunable optical properties.
Chapter
This chapter provides the reader with a better understanding of the life cycle environmental impacts, with a focus on the embodied impact of existing building stock. A systematic literature review is conducted to paint a clear picture of the current research activities and findings. The major components of embodied impact and parameters influencing the embodied impact are outlined and explained. Lastly, this chapter discusses the major barriers for the embodied impact assessment, and a potential analysis framework is proposed at the end.