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Comparison of brain activity during the conditions ''Qigong,'' ''Thinking of Nothing,'' and no-task rest in the two EEG frequency bands (alpha-2 and beta-1) that showed significant differences between the two meditative states. Glass brain axial views. Dark  

Comparison of brain activity during the conditions ''Qigong,'' ''Thinking of Nothing,'' and no-task rest in the two EEG frequency bands (alpha-2 and beta-1) that showed significant differences between the two meditative states. Glass brain axial views. Dark  

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Experienced Qigong meditators who regularly perform the exercises "Thinking of Nothing" and "Qigong" were studied with multichannel EEG source imaging during their meditations. The intracerebral localization of brain electric activity during the two meditation conditions was compared using sLORETA functional EEG tomography. Differences between cond...

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... brain regions reported above represent a general trend in both frequency bands: At uncorrected values of p \ 0.05 (df = 7, t [ 2.36), ''Qigong'' showed stronger activity than ''Thinking of Nothing'' in large posterior areas consisting in the alpha-2 band of 1993 of all 6,239 LORETA voxels and in the beta-1 band of 1,067 of all 6,239 LORETA voxels (Fig. 2a), while ''Thinking of Nothing'' showed stronger activity than ''Qigong'' in large anterior areas consisting in the alpha-2 band of 2,513 of all 6,239 LO-RETA voxels and in the beta-1 band of 1,210 of all 6,239 LORETA voxels (Fig. 2d). In other words, about 2/3 of all voxels reached p \ 0.05 in the alpha-2 band, and about 1/3 of all ...
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... in the alpha-2 band of 1993 of all 6,239 LORETA voxels and in the beta-1 band of 1,067 of all 6,239 LORETA voxels (Fig. 2a), while ''Thinking of Nothing'' showed stronger activity than ''Qigong'' in large anterior areas consisting in the alpha-2 band of 2,513 of all 6,239 LO-RETA voxels and in the beta-1 band of 1,210 of all 6,239 LORETA voxels (Fig. 2d). In other words, about 2/3 of all voxels reached p \ 0.05 in the alpha-2 band, and about 1/3 of all voxels in the beta-1 ...
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... was tested against ''Qigong'' and against ''Thinking of Nothing.'' There were no significant results after correction for multiple testing. However, at uncorrected p \ 0.05, in both frequency bands, ''Qigong'' differed from rest with stronger activity in more posterior regions compared to where ''Thinking of Nothing'' differed from rest (compare Fig. 2b to Fig. 2e, and Fig. 2c to Fig. 2f). In other words, for both frequency bands of interest, Fig. 2 shows that ''Qigong'' engaged posterior areas, while ''Thinking of Nothing'' engaged anterior areas. The number of qualifying voxels involved in the differences was much higher in the alpha-2 band than in the beta-1 band as shown in Table ...
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... against ''Qigong'' and against ''Thinking of Nothing.'' There were no significant results after correction for multiple testing. However, at uncorrected p \ 0.05, in both frequency bands, ''Qigong'' differed from rest with stronger activity in more posterior regions compared to where ''Thinking of Nothing'' differed from rest (compare Fig. 2b to Fig. 2e, and Fig. 2c to Fig. 2f). In other words, for both frequency bands of interest, Fig. 2 shows that ''Qigong'' engaged posterior areas, while ''Thinking of Nothing'' engaged anterior areas. The number of qualifying voxels involved in the differences was much higher in the alpha-2 band than in the beta-1 band as shown in Table 1. Further, ...
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... and against ''Thinking of Nothing.'' There were no significant results after correction for multiple testing. However, at uncorrected p \ 0.05, in both frequency bands, ''Qigong'' differed from rest with stronger activity in more posterior regions compared to where ''Thinking of Nothing'' differed from rest (compare Fig. 2b to Fig. 2e, and Fig. 2c to Fig. 2f). In other words, for both frequency bands of interest, Fig. 2 shows that ''Qigong'' engaged posterior areas, while ''Thinking of Nothing'' engaged anterior areas. The number of qualifying voxels involved in the differences was much higher in the alpha-2 band than in the beta-1 band as shown in Table 1. Further, Fig. 2 and ...
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... against ''Thinking of Nothing.'' There were no significant results after correction for multiple testing. However, at uncorrected p \ 0.05, in both frequency bands, ''Qigong'' differed from rest with stronger activity in more posterior regions compared to where ''Thinking of Nothing'' differed from rest (compare Fig. 2b to Fig. 2e, and Fig. 2c to Fig. 2f). In other words, for both frequency bands of interest, Fig. 2 shows that ''Qigong'' engaged posterior areas, while ''Thinking of Nothing'' engaged anterior areas. The number of qualifying voxels involved in the differences was much higher in the alpha-2 band than in the beta-1 band as shown in Table 1. Further, Fig. 2 and Table 1 show ...
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... after correction for multiple testing. However, at uncorrected p \ 0.05, in both frequency bands, ''Qigong'' differed from rest with stronger activity in more posterior regions compared to where ''Thinking of Nothing'' differed from rest (compare Fig. 2b to Fig. 2e, and Fig. 2c to Fig. 2f). In other words, for both frequency bands of interest, Fig. 2 shows that ''Qigong'' engaged posterior areas, while ''Thinking of Nothing'' engaged anterior areas. The number of qualifying voxels involved in the differences was much higher in the alpha-2 band than in the beta-1 band as shown in Table 1. Further, Fig. 2 and Table 1 show that the general activity level of the no-task resting state ...
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... to Fig. 2e, and Fig. 2c to Fig. 2f). In other words, for both frequency bands of interest, Fig. 2 shows that ''Qigong'' engaged posterior areas, while ''Thinking of Nothing'' engaged anterior areas. The number of qualifying voxels involved in the differences was much higher in the alpha-2 band than in the beta-1 band as shown in Table 1. Further, Fig. 2 and Table 1 show that the general activity level of the no-task resting state was between the two meditation states, differing from either one, but in opposite ...
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... during working memory performance (Klimesch 1999;Jensen et al. 2002;Palva and Palva 2007; at the parietaloccipital junction: Tuladhar et al. 2007). Thus, the earlier interpretation of alpha generally representing ''idling'' has given way to the view that alpha indicates the suppression TN ''Thinking of Nothing,'' rest mean rest. A-F columns of Fig. 2 of visual input in order to free capacity for other processing (e.g., Tuladhar et al. ...
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... meditators said that it is necessary to do ''Thinking of Nothing'' before doing ''Qigong.'' But, hypothesis (3) was not supported by the results: The results for no-task rest were positioned between the two meditations. The differences within the two frequency bands between the two meditations at the reduced thresholding of p \ 0.05 clearly show (Fig. 2a, d) the stronger posterior activation during ''Qigong'' and the stronger anterior activation during ''Thinking of Nothing,'' neatly separated in space, and clearly reflected by corresponding differences from no-task rest: stronger posterior activation during ''Qigong,'' stronger anterior activation during ''Thinking of Nothing'' (Fig. 2b, ...
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... show (Fig. 2a, d) the stronger posterior activation during ''Qigong'' and the stronger anterior activation during ''Thinking of Nothing,'' neatly separated in space, and clearly reflected by corresponding differences from no-task rest: stronger posterior activation during ''Qigong,'' stronger anterior activation during ''Thinking of Nothing'' (Fig. 2b, ...

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... The sLORETA voxels are attributable to Brodmann areas (BA) based on their Montreal Neurological Institute (MNI) coordinates. The procedure for analyzing EEG data is fully described by Faber et al. (2012), who performed a similar sLORETA analysis with 19 electrodes. ...
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... In such situations, the engaged neural networks need to maintain optimal neural activation by maintaining an optimal level of excitation-inhibition through suppression of neural network synchronization, which might "disturb" or "interfere" with the on-going processing of the relevant task. Thus, it is not surprising that increases in alpha power are also seen during meditation, which is typically associated with the redirecting of attention from external events to internal thoughts (Aftanas and Golocheikine, 2001;Faber et al., 2012). ...
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