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Comparison between the trophosome in the hydroid stages of Opercularella lacerata, Opercularella rugosa, Phialella quadrata, and JTMD specimen BF-382 (ROMIZ B4107).

Comparison between the trophosome in the hydroid stages of Opercularella lacerata, Opercularella rugosa, Phialella quadrata, and JTMD specimen BF-382 (ROMIZ B4107).

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Twenty-eight species of hydroids are now known from Japanese tsunami marine debris (JTMD) sent to sea in March 2011 from the Island of Honshu and landing between 2012 and 2016 in North America and Hawai‘i. To 12 JTMD hydroid species previously reported, we add an additional 16 species. Fourteen species (50%) were detected only once; given the small...

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... were obtained from JTMD objects (identi- fied as such through multiple lines of evidence; see Carlton et al. 2017) landing in North America and the Hawaiian Islands (Supplementary material Table S1). Each object was assigned a unique identification number preceded by JTMD-BF-(Japanese Tsunami Marine Debris-BioFouling-). Specimens retrieved from the field were either preserved directly in 95% ethanol, or frozen and transferred into ethanol at a later date. ...
Context 2
... approximately 20 × 20 cm scrapings were taken from the sides of a floating dock (JTMD-BF-1) originating from the Port of Misawa, Aomori Prefec- ture, which landed on the central Oregon coast in early June 2012 (Table S1). The samples were preserved in 70% ethanol and sent to the Geller Laboratory at Moss Landing Marine Laboratories, Moss Landing, California USA. ...

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... He therefore considered the two to be conspecific, a proposed synonymy that has been widely followed (e.g. Gibbons and Ryland 1989;Calder 1991;Watson 2000;Zhenzu et al. 2014;Wedler 2017;Choong et al. 2018). However, C. linearis clearly differs from the account of C. obliqua by Clarke (1907) in having colonies that are usually erect and sympodially branched, hydrothecae that are large and deep, and marginal cusps with distinctive inward-folding pleats that extend onto the distal wall of the hydrotheca (Lindner and Migotto 2002;Cunha et al. 2020). ...
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