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Common lizard (Photo: Ocrdu, 2015-published under creative commons licence [57]).

Common lizard (Photo: Ocrdu, 2015-published under creative commons licence [57]).

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This article argues that whilst our recent economic models are dependent on the overall ecosystem, they do not reflect this fact. As a result of this, we are facing Anthropocene mass extinction. The paper presents a collaborative regenerative region (COLreg) co-creation and tokenisation, involving multiple human and non-human, living and non-living...

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... the vegetation does not provide enough habitats, nesting boxes that these species like to inhabit are placed for them. From amphibians and reptiles, in the past (the year 1988), in the vicinity of Říčanka stream, there are species of brown frog, green toad, and common lizard (see Figure 3), and brittle hen. Among other animals, attractive inhabitants are, for example, red fallow deer, dark polecat, ermine weasel, and kolchava weasel [55]. ...

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