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Cohort analysis of fertile aged females, and births in the population of Ban Bunyuen.

Cohort analysis of fertile aged females, and births in the population of Ban Bunyuen.

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The Mla Bri of northern Thailand are a small group of hunter-gatherers who settled into settlements in the late twentieth century. One of the four places they settled was Ban Bunyuen. In 2013, a demographic survey of the settlement was undertaken. This was combined with mortality data from the last 15 years to describe the changing demgraphics, and...

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Context 1
... data is inferred from the age of the people living in Ban Bunyuen in 2013, combined with mortality data for children. One thing that is significant is that the Mla Bri living at Ban Bunyuen do not seem to have increased the ratio of fertile women to children since the 1980s, as might be expected for a population which is becoming sedentary (see Table 3). Thus, in each of the five-year cohorts, there is a ratio of 0.79- 1.11 children surviving per five-year period. ...
Context 2
... total of eighty-one out of 103 people lived in what might be called a "nuclear family" of a married mother and father, and children. Each family considered itself a household, even while sharing an address with others (see Table 3). ...
Context 3
... what the Mla Bri have experienced is instructive with respect to understanding both the resilience and fragility of cultural traditions among hunter-gatherers. Table 3), and seven, five, and five deaths in the age cohorts ending in 2018, 2023, and 2028 respectively. These forward projections are a synthetic number based on past fertility behavior, and past morality behavior in a population which is getting larger and in which there is expected to be no more child mortality. ...

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