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Cognitive Measures for Social Phobic and Control Children Variable Social phobic Control 

Cognitive Measures for Social Phobic and Control Children Variable Social phobic Control 

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Social skills, social outcomes, self-talk, outcome expectancies, and self-evaluation of performance during social-evaluative tasks were examined with 27 clinically diagnosed social phobic children ages 7-14 and a matched nonclinical group. Results showed that, compared with their nonanxious peers, social phobic children demonstrated lower expected...

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Context 1
... < .01. Thus, as predicted, social phobic children were less likely than control children were to expect positive social situations to occur (see Table 2). For the Negative-Social scale, the difference be- tween groups just failed to reach significance when the Bonferroni adjustment was applied, F(l, 52) = 6.06, ns, although there was a strong trend toward significance. ...
Context 2
... between-groups ANOVA indicated a significant difference between social phobic children and control children on the total number of reported cognitions, F(l, 52) = 5.92, p < .018, with social phobic children reporting fewer cognitions compared to nonclinical controls (see Table 2). Of primary interest to the present study, however, was the number of negative and positive cognitions. ...
Context 3
... between-groups difference was found for number of positive cognitions recalled, F(l, 51) = 2.27, ns. As shown in Table 2, the percentage of cognitions that were negative in content was considerably higher for the social phobic children. ...
Context 4
... not for Group X Task. Table 2 shows that the social phobic children expected their performance to be less successful than did their nonanxious peers on both tasks. Univariate ANOVAs, with Bonferroni adjustment, revealed significant differ- ences between groups for expected performance ratings on both the role-play task, F(l, 52) = 8.96, p < .01, ...
Context 5
... actual performance on the reading task is also shown in Table 2. There was no significant difference between groups in terms of actual reading performance, F(l, 51) = 0.25, ns. ...

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