Fig 3 - uploaded by Masayuki Osawa
Content may be subject to copyright.
Clibanarius ambonensis Rahayu & Forest, 1992. Male SL 4.1 mm, Komi, Iriomote Island (CMNH-ZC 1821). (A) Entire animal, dorsal view; (B) same, lateral view, right; (C) shield and cephalic appendages, dorsal view; (D) right carapace, cephalic appendages, and pereopods, dorsal view. 

Clibanarius ambonensis Rahayu & Forest, 1992. Male SL 4.1 mm, Komi, Iriomote Island (CMNH-ZC 1821). (A) Entire animal, dorsal view; (B) same, lateral view, right; (C) shield and cephalic appendages, dorsal view; (D) right carapace, cephalic appendages, and pereopods, dorsal view. 

Source publication
Article
Full-text available
The estuarine hermit crab, Clibanarius ambonensis is reported from Iriomote Island, southern Ryukyu Islands, Japan. This is the first record of the species from outside Indonesian territory. Clibanarius ambonensis was found on prop roots or trunks of Rhizophora stylosa or on rocks adjacent to the trees, which were exposed to the air at low tide tim...

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Specimens of Munidopsis bermudezi Chace, 1939, were collected during the Project entitled “Environmental characterization in the area of interest within the Guajira Offshore # 3, Colombian Caribbean block”. This is the first record of this species in the Colombian Caribbean Sea. This is the 46th species of the superfamily Galatheoidea registered fo...
Article
Full-text available
RESUMEN Se analizó la estructura del hábitat, el crecimiento relativo, la heteroquelia, la estructura poblacional, la madurez morfométrica y la fecundidad de Pachycheles laevidactylus Ortmann, 1892, durante Abril, Mayo y Junio del 2005, en sustratos naturales de Mar del Plata, Argentina (38°02'S, 57°31'W). La cobertura algal, la exposición al oleaj...

Citations

... Species of Clibanarius usually inhabit shallow waters, including both hard substrates (e.g., marine rocky shores and coral reefs) and soft sediments (e.g., mudflats, estuary flats and mangrove forests) (Osawa & Fujita, 2008), making them one of the most successfully adapted groups of intertidal hermit crabs. Moreover, these species can be morphologically separated into two major groups depending on the habitat. ...
... On the other hand, the long-dactylus group includes species that have slender second and third pereopods with the dactyli as long as, or slightly longer than, the propodi. They are generally found on soft sediments (Asakura, 2005;Osawa & Fujita, 2008;Malay et al., 2018). However, the evolutionary relationships for habitat adaptation in these species have also not yet been clarified. ...
... The types of habitats inhabited by species were obtained during specimen collection and/or decided from previously published studies (Osawa & Fujita, 2008;Malay et al., 2018). We categorized the habitats into two groups: hardbottom substrate (HS), which includes rocky shores, coral reefs, boulder beaches and dead-coral boulder beaches, and soft-bottom sediments (SS), which includes estuary-mudflats and estuary-mangrove forests. ...
Article
Species of hermit crabs in the genus Clibanarius Dana, 1852 have adapted to various environments in the intertidal areas, including hard substrates and soft sediments. These species often bear a close morphological resemblance to each other, therefore, the colouration on the pereopods can be one of the reliable characteristics to distinguish the species. However, the evolutionary relationships among species with different colour patterns and relationships between colour patterns and habitat adaptation have not previously been investigated. Therefore, we reconstructed the phylogenetic relationships among 19 species of Clibanarius based on mitochondrial [12S rRNA, 16S rRNA and cytochrome oxidase I] and nuclear [histone H3] DNA markers. The results suggest that the striped and solid colour elements have evolved multiple times independently, with the ancestral colour pattern potentially being scattered, bright colour spots with a bright colour band. Our findings also suggest that evolutionary adaptation from hard substrates to mudflats and soft sediments may have occurred at least twice.
... C. antillensis was the most abundant species in this study and showed a frequency of occurrence above 75% (constant) in all rocky shores, but particularly in GS. According to Osawa & Fujita (2008), species of the genus Clibanarius are frequent inhabitants of shallow waters and intertidal zones, where they inhabit rocky shores, coral reefs and estuarine areas, and they show high resistance to environmental variations. Moreover, to inhabit the intertidal regions, the hermit crabs must have physiological and behavioral adaptations to deal with water loss (Bertness, 1981;Taylor, 1981;Gherardi & Vannini, 1993). ...
Article
Rocky shores are ecosystems susceptible to anthropic impact, and the absence of information in Brazil about their biota hampers characterization and conservation measures. Thus, this study analyzed the abundance, richness, diversity and dominance of anomuran and brachyuran communities in sheltered and exposed rocky shores in Anchieta and Guarapari on the coast of Espírito Santo State. It was also studied the community variation concerning the types of rocky shores during the rainy and dry seasons. The organisms were collected manually in the mediolittoral zone of the rocky shores from October 2014 to September 2015. Additionally, temperature and salinity of the water were measured and the rainfall recorded from a meteorological station. In this study, 3,156 individuals were collected, comprising 14 species. The hermit crabs Clibanarius antillensis and Calcinus tibicen were the most abundant species. The three-way ANOVA analysis revealed that there was no interaction between ecological indices and the study locations, rocky shores and seasons. The abundance of the decapod community was statistically different between locations. The richness and diversity indices were higher on the sheltered rocky shore because of the presence of rock fragments and heterogeneous sediments, they are providing higher availability of microhabitats in these areas. There was no relationship between the decapod community and environmental factors, possibly because of a small variation of these factors registered between rainy and dry seasons. It is concluded that the anomuran and brachyuran communities are probably more influenced by biological interactions and physiographic features of rocky shores than by environmental factors.
... Although the colour of the specimen in this study ( Fig. 2B) is dark brown, much darker than the specimens studied by Osawa & Fujita (2008) and Rahayu & Setyadi (2009), the morphological characters agree well with the description of the species. This is the first report of this species from the Philippines. ...
Article
Full-text available
The PANGLAO 2004 expedition in the central Visayas region of the Philippines revealed the occurrence of 43 species of diogenid hermit crabs of the genera Calcinus, Clibanarius, and Dardanus in the Philippines. Using morphological, colour pattern, and mitochondrial DNA evidence, the Dardanus lagopodes (Forskål, 1775) complex is revised with the validation of D. sanguinolentus (Quoy & Gaimard, 1824) and the addition of one new species, Dardanus balhibuon. Eight species represent new records for the Philippine Archipelago. For each reported species, a list of the total number of specimens collected during the expedition is presented, and the geographic range and habitat are discussed. Colour photographs are provided for most species. A checklist of all hermit crab species recorded from the Philippines is presented, and species of these three genera previously reported from the Philippines but not found during the PANGLAO 2004 expedition are discussed.
... To complicate matters further, in all subsequent de− scriptive studies of diogenids that we have been able to con− sult, there is no reference to Mayo (1973). Instead, reference is made either to McLaughlin (2003), which lacks any illustra− tion of a diogenid carapace (see Osawa and Fujita 2008), to other studies which suffer from these same shortcomings (McLaughlin 1974;Forest et al. 2000; see also Asakura 2002), or to more extensive work in which carapace morphology is not considered in generic and specific diagnoses (e.g., Morgan 1991). Fossil carapaces such as the ones described herein are thus of note in helping unravel the origin of carapace regions and grooves and, thus, the phylogeny within the Paguroidea. ...
Article
Full-text available
A new species of diogenid paguroid, Eopaguropsis nidiaquilae, the earliest known member of the family to date, is re- corded from sponge-reefal strata of Oxfordian (Late Jurassic) age in the southern Polish Uplands. Morphological features of the carapace suggest that the family Diogenidae diverged from other paguroid lineages such as the Pylochelidae and Parapaguridae, long before the Oxfordian Stage (161.2-155.7 Ma). The typically deep, V-shaped cervical groove of diogenids most likely was the product of fusion of the branchiocardiac and cervical grooves of their predecessors.
... To complicate matters further, in all subsequent de− scriptive studies of diogenids that we have been able to con− sult, there is no reference to Mayo (1973). Instead, reference is made either to McLaughlin (2003), which lacks any illustra− tion of a diogenid carapace (see Osawa and Fujita 2008), to other studies which suffer from these same shortcomings (McLaughlin 1974;Forest et al. 2000; see also Asakura 2002), or to more extensive work in which carapace morphology is not considered in generic and specific diagnoses (e.g., Morgan 1991). Fossil carapaces such as the ones described herein are thus of note in helping unravel the origin of carapace regions and grooves and, thus, the phylogeny within the Paguroidea. ...
... Moreover, some species are discriminated primarily by color pattern, with only subtle morphological differences noted. The genus Clibanarius Dana, 1852, is a group of diogenid hermit crabs commonly found in shallow waters and currently includes 59 species worldwide and 37 species from the Indo-West Pacific (Osawa & Fujita 2006;McLaughlin et al. 2007). Most species are distributed between tropical and temperate areas and inhabit coral and rocky shores or sandy and muddy estuaries. ...
... Moreover, some species are discriminated primarily by color pattern, with only subtle morphological differences noted. The genus Clibanarius Dana, 1852, is a group of diogenid hermit crabs commonly found in shallow waters and currently includes 59 species worldwide and 37 species from the Indo-West Pacific (Osawa & Fujita 2006; McLaughlin et al. 2007). Most species are distributed between tropical and temperate areas and inhabit coral and rocky shores or sandy and muddy estuaries. ...
... Moreover, a close relationship between C. longitarsus, C. demani, and C. striolatus is also supported by relatively high bootstrap values (ML = 81%, MP = 75%, and NJ = 91%). Whereas these three species live in the same microhabitat of sandy or muddy substrates, C. ambonensis is usually found on the trunk of the mangrove tree Rhizophora stylosa (Osawa & Fujita 2006). Interestingly, C. ambonensis occupies the sister clade position of the clade of C. longitarsus + C. demani and C. striolatus in our phylogenetic tree. ...
Article
The diogenid hermit crab genus Clibanarius Dana, 1852 is a group of decapod crustaceans commonly found in tropical or subtropical shallow waters. The species of the genus are usually characterized by distinct color patterns in life, but the identification of colorless specimens preserved in ethanol is sometimes very difficult. DNA barcoding can facilitate species identification and recognition. In this study, we determined partial sequences of the cytochrome oxidase I (COI) gene of 11 Clibanarius species commonly found in the intertidal zones of the Ryukyu Archipelago, southwestern Japan. The sequences can be used as nametags to distinguish each of the 11 species, as the data differ for each species. The COI gene sequences of Clibanarius show an AT bias, especially in the third codon position (A+T = 76.2%), as has been reported for some other anomuran species. Phylogenetic analyses based on the sequences also offer some suggestions on the interspecific relationships of Clibanarius.
... Com.), primarily distributed in tropical and subtropical regions, with six reported from the western Atlantic coast (Forest and de Saint Laurent, 1968). Species of Clibanarius usually inhabit shallow waters, including marine rocky shores, coral reefs, and estuarine areas with sand and mud substrates (Osawa and Fujita, 2005). ...
Article
The striped-legged hermit crab Clibanarius vittatus, with a geographical distribution covering a wide range of latitudes in the western Atlantic, was selected for a comparative study on population features between two different areas of the Brazilian coast that are separated by approximately 3000 km. The two populations were sampled concurrently for nine months. The populations in northern and southeastern Brazil showed different profiles in terms of size of specimens, sex ratio, and shell occupation. The observed plasticity of these life-cycle traits of C. vittatus in relation to local environmental conditions is discussed.
... C. ambonensis, C, demani, a inj}"aspinatus, C. Iongitarsus, C. ransoni, and C. striotatus. The habitat of C. ambonensts is unique; it is found on prop roots or trunks of the mangrove tree Rhizophora stylosa Griffith, which are exposed to the air at low tide (Osawa and Fujita 2006). Excluding C pacijicus, the other eight species, C. corallinus, C. englaucus, C, euivsternus, C humilis, C merguiensis, C. rhabdodactylus, C. snelliusi, and C, virescens, can be found in estuarine areas, but they usually occur under rocks or on hard substrates, and prefer to inhabit roeky shores or coral reef flats, In Southeast Asian waters, nine species closely allied to the two species treated in the present study and to C. Iongitarsus in respect to morphology and/or coloration are known: C antennatus Rahayu and Forest, 1993;C. ...
Article
Two estuarine species of the hermit crab genus Clibanarius are recorded for the first time from the Ryukyu Islands, southern Japan. The occurrence of Clibanarius demani Buitendijk, 1937 in Okinawa Island represents a new addition to the Japanese fauna and greatly extends its distributional range to the northeast. Clibanarius infraspinatus (Hilgendorf, 1869) is broadly distributed in the Indo-West Pacific including the mainland of Japan, but there have been no definite records from the Ryukyu Islands until the present report. A brief note on the species of Clibanarius recorded from the Ryukyu Islands is provided, along with a key to these species.
Article
Hermit crabs community in the intertidal zones of Larak Island were investigated through a seasonal sampling at five stations using random quadrate sampling method. Overall, seven species were identified and Clibanarius signatus was the dominant species, which showed high dominance over other species. Using Bray-Curtis cluster analysis for comparing seasonal abundance showed that except spring, other seasons form one cluster. A significant correlation was observed (P<0.05) between Simpson dominance index with temperature, dissolved oxygen and total organic matter. This study showed that the Simpson dominance index was high, primarily because of high dominance of C.signatus in intertidal zones of Larak Island. The high species dominance and low species richness in hermit crabs community in Larak Island could be because of unsuitable living conditions and lack of habitat diversity, such as muddy shores and mangrove forests.