Cherax quadricarinatus, lateral view of male, Upper Peirce Reservoir, Singapore. Total body length = 176.4 mm; cephalothorax length = 65 mm. (Photograph by: Tan Heok Hui). 

Cherax quadricarinatus, lateral view of male, Upper Peirce Reservoir, Singapore. Total body length = 176.4 mm; cephalothorax length = 65 mm. (Photograph by: Tan Heok Hui). 

Similar publications

Article
Full-text available
Cherax quadricarinatus is a decapod crustacean of interest to the aquaculture industry. In Mexico, a significant effort has been made to improve biological requirements, but the genetic characteristics are unknown. We examined the genetic diversity and differentiation in four populations in Mexico (three commercial farms and one feral population),...
Article
Full-text available
In the last few years, there has been a notable development in the breeding of freshwater shrimp (astaciculture), which involved various species and in particular, the two Australian Parastacidae species, Cherax destructor and Cherax quadricarinatus. Information about the haemolymphatic parameters of these two species is fragmentary, and filling th...
Article
Full-text available
Redclaw, Cherax quadricarinatus, is a freshwater crayfish endemic to rivers of northeastern Australia. Aquaculturists have suggested that redclaw from different catchments may be of varying suitability for cultivation. Production characteristics (total yield, size/sex distribution), morphology, reproductive characteristics (size at maturity, fecund...
Article
Full-text available
Feeding trials with five levels of crude protein (CP) (22%, 27%, 33%, 39%, and 45%) and digestible energy ranging from 14.32 to 15.21 kJ g−1 were carried out to determine optimum dietary protein for the growth and production of pre-adult freshwater crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus. Triplicate groups of males (ω=23.1±0.58 g) and females (ω=21.8±0.33...

Citations

... Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens, 1868) is native to the freshwater environments of northern Australia and southern New Guinea (Lawrence and Jones 2002;Bláha et al. 2016;Patoka et al. 2016). The redclaw crayfish has been translocated worldwide mainly for aquaculture and aquarium pet trade purposes (Harlioğlu and Harlioğlu 2006;Ahyong and Yeo 2007;Bortolini et al. 2007;Belle and Yeo 2010;Snovsky and Galil 2011;Torres-Montoya et al. 2016;Azofeifa-Solano et al. 2017;Nunes et al. 2017;Patoka et al. 2018;Weiperth et al. 2019;Morningstar et al. 2020). In Malaysia, the introduction of redclaw is associated with the aquaculture production of this species, which can be traced back to 2003 in Johor (border with Singapore), the southern part of Peninsular Malaysia (Chang 2001;Naqiuddin et al. 2016). ...
Article
Full-text available
Six individuals of Australian redclaw crayfish Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens, 1868) (Decapoda: Parastacidae), the identity of which was confirmed through morphological and molecular characterization. They were caught from the wild environment in Terengganu, East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia. Since there is no record of redclaw aquaculture in close vicinity of the sampling site, it is hypothesized that the introduction of the species has been caused through a release by aquarists. Further studies are essential to understand the distribution and potential impacts of this invasive species in the area, and in the East Coast of Peninsular Malaysia.
... Since most of the streams in Pok Fu Lam Country Park are connected through the reservoir, it is highly likely that C. quadricarinatus will colonize all the streams draining into the basin. In Singapore, C. quadricarinatus was first reported in 2007 and has spread to at least 3 of 13 reservoirs (Ahyong and Yeo 2007;Belle and Yeo 2010;Belle et al. 2011). Therefore, to detect new invasion fronts of this species, the local authority in Hong Kong should consider employing environmental DNA (eDNA) techniques, which have been demonstrated to be feasible and reliable elsewhere (Cai et al. 2017). ...
Article
Full-text available
Invasive freshwater crayfish are spreading rapidly across the world. Here, we report the first record of Australian redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens, 1868) in Hong Kong, China. Identification of the captured crayfish was confirmed using external morphological features and molecular analyses. A total of 49 crayfish were captured from a stream pool and a reservoir in Pok Fu Lam Country Park using dip nets and funnel traps. The captured C. quadricarinatus ranged from 17.20 mm to 56.40 mm (mean = 30.70 mm) in carapace length and the sex ratio was 1:1. Since this species is globally recognized as an invasive species, a comprehensive survey on its status and invasion front, an investigation into its potential ecological impacts, as well as the formulation of a monitoring and removal strategy, are warranted.
... Redclaw impairs about 30% of fishery catches by disfiguring and consumption of the caught fish, as well as by net damage, when entangled crayfish are being removed, resulting in increased operational costs as reported in Africa Douthwaite et al. 2018;Maurice et al. 2020), as well as Malaysia (Awangku et al. 2016). On the other hand, redclaw fishery is considered valuable at other places, which apply to the artisanal fishery mentioned above, and recreational fisheries (Ahyong & Yeo 2007;Belle & Yeo 2010) providing even greater potential for positive socio-economic effects. However, simultaneous decline of local biota including at least some fished species following redclaw establishment is expected (Vega-Villasante et al. 2015;Todd 2017;Douthwaite et al. 2018), although this remains a poorly documented issue. ...
Article
Full-text available
The redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus; hereafter redclaw), native to northern Australia and southern New Guinea, is among the largest freshwater deca-pods. It matures early and is considered highly prolific as females may lay over one thousand eggs in a single clutch. Despite generally preferring slow-moving streams in its native range, it has a wide environmental tolerance, making it capable of establishing populations when introduced to a wide range of other conditions and habitats. These biological and ecological features render it a highly suitable and popular species for aquaculture worldwide, being the second most important crayfish species economically (after the red swamp crayfish Procam-barus clarkii). Adding to that, its unique coloration fuels demand and value among aquarium enthusiasts, making it attractive for the aquarium pet trade. Today, redclaw is widely translocated (67 countries/territories) and various established wild populations (22 countries) have been reported on every continent except Antarctica. Information on its potential or observed impacts, however, is sparse and often anecdotal. To address this gap, this comprehensive review compiles all available information on this species, covering its taxonomy and description , biology and ecology, native and non-native ranges accompanied with documented introduction pathways. Built upon these, we conducted biological and socioeconomic classification and species distribution modelling. We reveal a lack of thorough impact assessments for this species despite sufficient indications of major observable impacts at local scales. We call attention to the importance of managing the use of this prominent introduced species in aquaculture and aquarium pet trade.
... The redclaw crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus is a tropical freshwater crayfish from the family Parastacidae [1]. The native habitat of the C. quadricarinatus is the river catchments in northern Australia and south eastern Papua New Guinea [2]. ...
... Currently, Cherax quadricarinatus (Von Martens, 1868) is widely distributed in riverbeds, freshwater irrigation channels, and brackish-water lagoons and is a fast-growing species, reaching 250 mm total body length and 600 g average wet mass in 9 months (Ponce-Palafox et al. 1999Belle et al. 2010). This crayfish has gregarious habits, flexible diet and high tolerance to physicochemical variations in the environment (Snovsky and Galil 2011). ...
Article
Full-text available
The establishment of the redclaw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) populations was investigated in the coastal plain of San Blas, Nayarit State, Mexico. Two sampling expeditions were conducted along the agricultural irrigation channels and the surrounding estuarine systems in the study area in December 2014 and December 2015. A total of 121 specimens were collected during the first sampling. They had 1:1.88 male:female ratio. Three hundred fourteen (314) individuals were collected in the second expedition, the male:female ratio was 1:1.27. C. quadricarinatus has a great ability to colonize, invade and survive a wide range of environmental conditions in aquatic ecosystems, representing a threat to biological diversity. This species has the potential to replace the native crayfish species that significantly sustain the local fisheries, affecting and limiting their distribution and abundance. This has probably affected diversity, population structure and symbiotic relationships of functional groups in this aquatic ecosystem.
... Cherax quadricarinatus is indigenous to North-Eastern Australia and Southern New Guinea ( Bláha et al. 2016). It is a typical successful invasive crayfish species being introduced to numerous freshwater localities in South-East Asia (Ahyong & Yeo, 2007;Belle & Yeo, 2010;Patoka et al., 2016Patoka et al., , 2018b), Africa ( Nunes et al., 2017), Central America ( Bortolini et al., 2007), and Europe (Jaklič & Vrezec, 2011;Weiperth et al., 2019). Therefore, the correct identification of this crayfish species is crucial for conservationists, decisionmakers, wildlife managers and other stakeholders including aquarium pet owners and traders. ...
Conference Paper
Full-text available
Crayfish species are identified both morphologically and genetically. Numerous characteristics are used in morphological analyses. Although, there are known intraspecific variability in rostral shape and length in many crayfish species, some identification keys still use mentioned characteristics as crucial in species determination. Here we present recorded unusual deformities of two individuals of Cherax quadricarinatus, the species indigenous to NorthEastern Australia and Southern New Guinea. It is obvious, that these morphological characteristics have to be used for species identification purpose with caution and should be excluded from analyses of crayfish individuals with described deformities.
... The species has been reported in many countries, such as South Africa, Swaziland, Italy, Israel, continental USA, Mexico, Ecuador, Puerto Rico, Argentina, New Caledonia, China, Taiwan, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia (Harlioğlu and Harlioğlu 2006;Ahyong and Yeo 2007;Bortolini et al. 2007 al. 2017). Negative effects of C. quadricarinatus invasive populations may pose a threat by carrying viruses and parasites (Hauck et al. 2001;Bowater et al. 2002;Romero and Jimenez 2002) and probably causing food web impacts that may result in local disappearance of species (Beatty 2006;Bortolini et al. 2007;Ahyong and Yeo 2007;Belle and Yeo 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens, 1868) was first introduced into Costa Rica during 1985. Currently there are aquaculture holding facilities for this species in the Costa Rican Pacific drainage. This study is the first to report the presence of C. quadricarinatus in natural freshwater systems at the Caribbean drainage of Costa Rica. This may has been the result of accidental releases of this non-native crayfish from holding facilities. Future surveys are needed to assess the effects of this crayfish on the freshwater systems of Costa Rica and its communities.
... It belongs to the Northern group of Cherax crayfish and inhabits streams, billabongs, and lakes in the northern part of the Northern Territory and far north Queensland in Australia and the southern part of New Guinea (Munasinghe et al., 2004;Bláha et al., 2016). This species has been successfully introduced to, and has established feral populations within, several tropical and subtropical countries, including Jamaica (Todd, 2002), Mexico (Bortolini et al., 2007;Vega-Villasante et al., 2015), Puerto Rico (Williams Jr et al., 2001), Singapore (Ahyong and Yeo, 2007;Belle and Yeo, 2010), and South Africa (De Moor, 2002). Only one population in the temperate zone has thus far been recorded, that being in Slovenia (Jaklič and Vrezec, 2011). ...
Article
Full-text available
Cherax quadricarinatus (von Martens) (Decapoda: Astacidea: Parastacidae) is commercially exploited and has been intentionally introduced to various tropical and subtropical countries. Once established in the wild, it frequently becomes invasive. In Indonesia, this crayfish is native only to the southern part of the Papua Province. Cherax quadricarinatus is produced in semi-intensive farms for food as well as for ornamental purposes on most of Indonesian territory. We present here the first record of this species from Java, where this crayfish has formed at least two established feral populations. In total, eight subadult and adult crayfish of both sexes were captured in two natural lakes in the city of Bogor, West Java Province. Based on climate match, we suggest that C. quadricarinatus has high potential to become established within most of Indonesian territory. As a rapidly growing species with broad tolerance to varying environmental conditions, its spread is expected and it should be viewed as a possible threat to native decapod crustaceans. Detailed monitoring is therefore needed.
... Because demand continues to grow, this price increase is not likely to cause a decline in the quantities of imported ornamental crayfish. In many countries, the minimum retail price of ornamental crayfish is slightly higher than c3 per individual, as noted by Turkmen and Karadal (2012) and by Belle and Yeo (2010) We found the lowest retail price per individual of imported crayfish was close to c3 in the Czech Republic. The highest recorded retail price per individual was slightly above c25 (for Cherax cainii, C. preissii and C.sp. Blue Moon) (Table I) similarly to German market (Chucholl (2013). ...
Article
Full-text available
The import of aquarium animals has been increasing worldwide in recent years. Despite its contribution to world trade and the economy, this trade also comprises one of the main pathways for the introduction of non-indigenous animals. In the past decade, crayfish has become a popular pet as well as a potential threat to the environment upon its escape or release. Since the Czech Republic is one of the world's leading importer, exporter, and producer of aquatic ornamental animals, we prepared a de-tailed analysis of crayfish imports. The present paper provides a complete list of countries supplying ornamental crayfish and examines trends of their prices and imported quantities during the past decade (2003–2012). Indonesia has been identified as the leading supplier in recent years. The annual average price of imported crayfish has varied over the evaluated period within the range of c0.76–4.72 per individual and it is rising annu-ally by c0.15. The quantity of live crayfish imported for aquarium purposes has not been affected significantly by the price per individual and it has grown rapidly. Therefore a constant monitoring of this pet trade sector is strongly recommended for the future. RÉSUMÉ
... Bu türün sergilediği hızlı büyüme, üreme kolaylığı ve olumsuz ortam koşullarına uyum özellikleri kerevit yetiştiriciliğinde önemli kriterlerdir. Akvaryum sektörü açısından bakıldığında akvaryum canlılarının adeta satış merkezi konumunda olan Singapur'da ticareti en çok yapılan kerevit türünün C. quadricarinatus olduğu ve ergin bireylerinin 2,5-7,5 TL arasında pazarlandıkları bildirilmektedir (Belle ve Yeo, 2010). ...
Article
Full-text available
Australian red claw crayfish (Cherax quadricarinatus) are one of the cultivated species all around the world. This species has became more popular in recent years with increasing interest in decapod species in freshwater aquariums. In this study, effects of different feeds (flake, stick, granule, Tubifex) on growth and survival of Australian red claw crayfish in aquarium conditions were investigated. The study was carried out in 12 glass aquariums with three replicates. A group of 15 early juveniles (average 0.0165 g of body weight) were placed in each aquarium. The crayfish were fed with ad libitum for 120 days. At the end of the study, the best weight gain was found on granule diet group and the lowest survival rate was found on Tubifex group statistically (P<0.01).