Chemical structure of nicotine (with permission Bentham Science Publishers © ). 65 

Chemical structure of nicotine (with permission Bentham Science Publishers © ). 65 

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Cigarette smoking is the primary cause of lung cancer, cardiovascular diseases, reproductive disorders, and delayed wound healing all over the world. The goals of smoking cessation are both to reduce health risks and to improve quality of life. The development of novel and more effective medications for smoking cessation is crucial in the treatment...

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Context 1
... unpleasant effects appear more common in nonsmokers or light smokers than heavy smokers. 36 Nicotine is a weak base containing a pyridine and a pyrrolidine ring; each one possesses a tertiary amine (Figure 1). The pK a of the pyridine nitrogen is 3.04, whereas the pK a of the pyrrolidine nitrogen is 7.84 at physiologic temperature and ionic strength. ...
Context 2
... itself is a very small molecule ( Figure 1) and is not able to induce antibodies directed against it. But it can be chemically linked to a carrier protein, which renders the nicotine molecule visible to the immune system. ...

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